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Backstory » A Zero-Energy Community: Part 6

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:28 AM
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by Brad Liljequist last modified Dec 07, 2011

by Brad Liljequist Project Manager Brad Liljequist chronicles the building of zHome, a ten-unit townhome in Issaquah, Washington—the first multifamily zero-energy community in the United States. Part 6: The Backstory... Having already gone into the nitty-gritty of green materials and stormwater management, and chronicled the making-of a zero-energy building, I thought I'd back up even further, and talk a bit about how zHome originally came to be. The project officially started life in March of 2006, when I brought a small group of regional green building innovators together with a common vision to build a community which radically redefined the environmental footprint of production housing. We each played leadership roles in green building in our respective organizations, which included the City of Issaquah (represented by David Fujimoto and me, working as a consultant with GordonDerr to the City), Built Green (Aaron Adelstein), King County GreenTools (Patti Southard and Katie Spataro, who now works for the Cascadia Green Building Council), and Chuck Murray (then with Washington State University Energy Program, now with the WA State Department of Commerce).




 

 

zHome_blog6_thumb

by Brad Liljequist

Project Manager Brad Liljequist chronicles the building of zHome, a ten-unit townhome in Issaquah, Washington—the first multifamily zero-energy community in the United States. Part 6: The Backstory... Having already gone into the nitty-gritty of green materials and stormwater management, and chronicled the making-of a zero-energy building, I thought I'd back up even further, and talk a bit about how zHome originally came to be. The project officially started life in March of 2006, when I brought a small group of regional green building innovators together with a common vision to build a community which radically redefined the environmental footprint of production housing. We each played leadership roles in green building in our respective organizations, which included the City of Issaquah (represented by David Fujimoto and me, working as a consultant with GordonDerr to the City), Built Green (Aaron Adelstein), King County GreenTools (Patti Southard and Katie Spataro, who now works for the Cascadia Green Building Council), and Chuck Murray (then with Washington State University Energy Program, now with the WA State Department of Commerce).



 

 

 
 
 

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