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Detour » We're Not in Kansas Anymore

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:26 AM
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by Miyoko Ohtake last modified Apr 06, 2011

by Miyoko Ohtake On May 4, 2007, Greensburg, Kansas, was wiped off the map. An EF5 tornado ravished the small town of 1,400 residents, destroying or severely damaging 95 percent of the city. Less than a week later, however, the survivors did the incredible: At a meeting under a tent, they rallied to rebuild as a sustainable city. Some community members at first were skeptical, but they later embraced the idea of following in the footsteps of their ancestors, who had lived off the land. With the backing of the city, state, and federal governments and the nonprofit Greensburg GreenTown, founded by nearby Stafford County residents Daniel Wallach and Catherine Hart, the town has become a sustainable mecca—boasting more than 25 green projects so far and attracting thousands of eco-tourists.




 

 

greensburg kansas square

by Miyoko Ohtake

On May 4, 2007, Greensburg, Kansas, was wiped off the map. An EF5 tornado ravished the small town of 1,400 residents, destroying or severely damaging 95 percent of the city. Less than a week later, however, the survivors did the incredible: At a meeting under a tent, they rallied to rebuild as a sustainable city. Some community members at first were skeptical, but they later embraced the idea of following in the footsteps of their ancestors, who had lived off the land. With the backing of the city, state, and federal governments and the nonprofit Greensburg GreenTown, founded by nearby Stafford County residents Daniel Wallach and Catherine Hart, the town has become a sustainable mecca—boasting more than 25 green projects so far and attracting thousands of eco-tourists.

 

 

 
 
 

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