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A Cardboard Cathedral for Christchurch

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Aug 13, 2013 01:02 AM
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by Promila Shastri last modified Aug 11, 2013

The people of Christchurch, New Zealand, who saw their city ravaged by a deadly earthquake in 2011, have something to celebrate today, thanks to the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban. Just 2 years after the 6.3 magnitude earthquake killed 185 people and irrevocably destroyed ChristChurch Cathedral, the city’s enigmatic 19th Century — Continue reading …




 

 

Screen shot 2013-08-11 at 9.50.03 AM

The people of Christchurch, New Zealand, who saw their city ravaged by a deadly earthquake in 2011, have something to celebrate today, thanks to the Japanese architect Shigeru Ban.

Just 2 years after the 6.3 magnitude earthquake killed 185 people and irrevocably destroyed ChristChurch Cathedral, the city’s enigmatic 19th Century Anglican church, Ban’s stunningly innovative temporary replacement has been completed. Cardboard Cathedral, a piece of ‘transitional architecture’ comprised primarily of recycled cardboard tubes, with a lifespan of approximately 50 years, opened its doors today, providing Christchurch’s residents with a place of worship until a permanent replacement for the original Gothic cathedral is found.

Ban, who has long advocated the use of cardboard tubing as disaster relief material, has designed a simple A-frame structure comprised of 98 massive cardboard tubes, 8 steel shipping containers, and a striking triangle of colored glass. With seating for 700 people, the Cardboard Cathedral, says Ban, is one of the safest in the city, better equipped to withstand an earthquake than many permanent edifices. “The strength of the building has nothing to do with the strength of the material. Even concrete buildings can be destroyed by earthquakes very easily, but paper buildings cannot.”

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Images: Jocelyn Kinghorn, Arch Daily


 

 

 
 
 

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