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Blog » Fritz Hansen on Knockoffs and Authentic Design

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jun 14, 2012 01:02 AM
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by Jaime Gillin last modified Jun 13, 2012

by Jaime Gillin In recent years, the Danish furniture company Fritz Hansen has taken aggressive measures to protect their products against knockoffs and counterfeits across the globe. They have rounded up and destroyed numerous counterfeit Series 7 chairs (labeled incorrectly and illegally as Fritz Hansen products), identifying the pieces as fakes by their shoddy quality and lack of official identification (since 2006, all authentic Fritz Hansen products have a unique serial number and a tag with an invisible thread in it to validate its authenticity). They’ve also campaigned on the internet, releasing viral videos that show company employees stomping on fake Series 7 chairs (spoiler alert, they break) and then stomping on a real one (which bouncily absorbs the employee’s weight). Though their classic designs are thoroughly protected in Europe under Registered Community Design laws, they are not safeguarded in the U.S., where intellectual property protections are weaker and expire more quickly. Some, of course, see this as a good thing, as they return classic designs to the public realm for free and unrestrained reinterpretation by a new generation of designers—but that also opens things up to copycats.




 

 

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by Jaime Gillin

In recent years, the Danish furniture company Fritz Hansen has taken aggressive measures to protect their products against knockoffs and counterfeits across the globe. They have rounded up and destroyed numerous counterfeit Series 7 chairs (labeled incorrectly and illegally as Fritz Hansen products), identifying the pieces as fakes by their shoddy quality and lack of official identification (since 2006, all authentic Fritz Hansen products have a unique serial number and a tag with an invisible thread in it to validate its authenticity). They’ve also campaigned on the internet, releasing viral videos that show company employees stomping on fake Series 7 chairs (spoiler alert, they break) and then stomping on a real one (which bouncily absorbs the employee’s weight). Though their classic designs are thoroughly protected in Europe under Registered Community Design laws, they are not safeguarded in the U.S., where intellectual property protections are weaker and expire more quickly. Some, of course, see this as a good thing, as they return classic designs to the public realm for free and unrestrained reinterpretation by a new generation of designers—but that also opens things up to copycats.



 

 

 
 
 

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