Personal tools
log in | join | help
Sections

Architecture » A Family Home in Israel

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:21 AM
Editorial Rating: 1 2 3 4 5
Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)
by Jaime Gross last modified Dec 06, 2011

by Jaime Gross Located in Ramat-Hasharon, a suburb of Tel Aviv in Israel, this 2,100-square-foot house was designed by Keren Milchberg Porat for a family of six—a cinematographer and art director and their four children, ranging in age from one to 17 years old. Porat, who heads up the architecture firm Studio ID253, used a slew of recycled and raw materials, strategically located openings to maximize ventilation and natural light, and "circular passages" to create an open and flexible family home that works equally well for entertaining large groups of people—something the family loves to do. ‎‏Originally the owners were inspired by prefab techniques and concepts. But "due to the fact that they couldn't find any local Israeli contractor with validated prefab experience, and their budget was too tight to simply fly in a crew from the states or Europe, they decided to go the only way they could—with conventional and traditional building methods popular in Israel," says Porat. "But certain prefab-inspired design elements remained, such as cement floors, industrial roofing, extensive use of large windows, and large deck areas that surround the interior of the house."




 

 

ramat_thumb

by Jaime Gross

Located in Ramat-Hasharon, a suburb of Tel Aviv in Israel, this 2,100-square-foot house was designed by Keren Milchberg Porat for a family of six—a cinematographer and art director and their four children, ranging in age from one to 17 years old. Porat, who heads up the architecture firm Studio ID253, used a slew of recycled and raw materials, strategically located openings to maximize ventilation and natural light, and "circular passages" to create an open and flexible family home that works equally well for entertaining large groups of people—something the family loves to do. ‎‏Originally the owners were inspired by prefab techniques and concepts. But "due to the fact that they couldn't find any local Israeli contractor with validated prefab experience, and their budget was too tight to simply fly in a crew from the states or Europe, they decided to go the only way they could—with conventional and traditional building methods popular in Israel," says Porat. "But certain prefab-inspired design elements remained, such as cement floors, industrial roofing, extensive use of large windows, and large deck areas that surround the interior of the house."



 

 

 
 
 

Website migration, maintenance and customization provided by Grafware.