Personal tools
log in | join | help
Sections

Coal-Free Washington Bill Awaits Governor’s Signature

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:14 AM
Editorial Rating: 1 2 3 4 5
Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)
by Dawn Killough last modified May 02, 2011

The Washington State Legislature put its final stamp of approval on a plan to responsibly transition TransAlta Corp's Centralia, Washington, power plant off of coal. The bill, which was supported by several environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, the National Parks Conservation Association and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center, requires TransAlta to phase out its 1,460-megawatt coal plant in stages between 2020 and 2025.




 

 

The Washington State Legislature put its final stamp of approval on a plan to responsibly transition TransAlta Corp’s Centralia, Washington, power plant off of coal. The state Senate approved technical changes made in the House and sent the Coal-Free Future for Washington bill to Governor Chris Gregoire for her signature. 

The bill, which was supported by several environmental groups, including the Sierra Club, the National Parks Conservation Association and the Northwest Environmental Defense Center, requires TransAlta to phase out its 1,460-megawatt coal plant in stages between 2020 and 2025. 

This historic initiative is the product of an agreement between TransAlta, Washington environmental leaders, unions, and the governor. The extended timeline is meant to assist workers in transitioning out of the plant, and to facilitate the change to other power sources for the region.

“The positive Senate vote brings us one step closer to a coal-free future for Washington, in which all God’s children have clean air and water and the opportunity to earn a living wage,” said LeeAnne Beres, Earth Ministry executive director . “This bill will transition our state off of coal while providing much-needed investment in energy efficiency and economic development in Lewis County, and is a win for our environment, our economy, and our communities.”

The bill includes not only phasing-out operations at the coal plant, but provides $30 million for economic development and energy efficiency jobs in the community and another $25 million to develop clean energy technology in Washington. The investment in renewable energy and energy efficiency measures is expected to create more jobs than simply switching to another fossil fuel, according to NW Energy Coalition policy director, Nancy Hirsh.

Many visitors to the state have had their view of Mount Rainier and Olympic national parks clouded by the haze created by the TransAlta coal plant, says National Parks Conservation Association Clean Air Counsel Stephanie Kodish. Now visitors can look forward to seeing the mountains without all the pollution.

Supporters say they will work hard to insure that the bill’s tenents are carried out in a responsible way, safeguarding the environmental and economic future of the state.

The Environmental Priorities Coalition, a co-sponsor of the bill, is a network of 24 leading environmental groups in Washington state who believe that it is possible to have a strong economy that provides everyone with the opportunity to prosper and a clean, healthy and safe environment. Formed in 2003, the Coalition selects priority issues each legislative session that are important to protecting public health and welfare.

Source: PR Newsire

Photo Source: Adam Jakubiak

PrintFriendly

 

 

 
 
 

Website migration, maintenance and customization provided by Grafware.