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Our Green Home Cost a Lot, But Yours Doesn't Have To

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Mar 29, 2014 01:00 AM
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by Alex Wilson last modified Mar 19, 2014

Author name:  Alex Wilson Blog Category:  Energy Solutions GreenSpec Insights Our house cost a lot more than I would have liked, but many of the ideas used in it could be implemented more affordably. We picked up these two salvaged garage doors for $500 total—while new they would have cost $3,500 apiece. Using salvaged materials can save a lot of money. Photo Credit: Alex Wilson My wife and I tried out a lot of innovative systems and materials in the renovation/rebuild of our Dummerston, Vermont home—some of which added considerably to the project cost. Alas! The induction cooktop that I wrote about last week is just one such example. For me, the house has been a one-time opportunity to gain experience with state-of-the-art products and technologies, some of which are very new to the building industry (like cork insulation , which was expensive both to buy and to install). We spent a lot experimenting with new materials, construction details, and building systems. While we haven’t tallied up all the costs, we think that the house came in at about $250 per square foot. All this has raised the very reasonable question about whether all this green-building stuff is only feasible for high-budget projects . So I’ve been thinking about what lessons from our project would be applicable to more budget-conscious retrofits. Here are some thoughts. (Also see our recent EBN feature article,  How to Build Green At No Added Cost .) read more





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