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AIA Top 10 New Homes – Part I

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Apr 11, 2014 01:01 AM
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by Glenn Meyers last modified Apr 10, 2014

The American Institute of Architects has selected 10 top new American homes for the 2014 Housing Awards. According to AIA, “ The AIA’s Housing Awards program, now in its 14th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the The post AIA Top 10 New Homes – Part I appeared first on Green Building Elements .




 

 

The American Institute of Architects has selected 10 top new American homes for the 2014 Housing Awards.

According to AIA, “ The AIA’s Housing Awards program, now in its 14th year, was established to recognize the best in housing design and promote the importance of good housing as a necessity of life, a sanctuary for the human spirit and a valuable national resource.”

We will show five homes today, and five tomorrow. This palette of work is refreshing to behold. Thanks very much to AIA for publishing these awards.

These brief descriptions from AIA provide a view of the projects. Should you wish to learn more about these projects, click on the name of the project/firm name. 

AIA Informal House photo1

Informal House; South Pasadena, CA

Koning Eizenberg Architecture, Inc.

“This house was custom designed for a family of four. The idea for this house was not to blur the distinction from indoor to outdoor with big walls of glass, but to intensify the quality of each. Sustainable choices facilitate the client’s interest in indoor outdoor living. Green roofs insulate the lower roofs while they strengthen the articulation between activity spaces and service spaces. Exposed materials with a high thermal mass and polished concrete floors take advantage of the significant daily temperature swing in this coastal climate. A cool white roof, easily accessed for cleaning minimizes solar gain, critical in this sunny climate.”

AIA 2 Kicking Horse residence photo1

Kicking Horse Residence; British Columbia

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

“The clients desired a weekend gathering place for their active family of five that would allow for flexibility to accommodate larger groups of family and friends and provide a direct connection to the outdoors for seasonal recreation. The design inherently reduces exposure to natural drainage patterns by limiting the building footprint. The architects worked directly with the contractor to detail the below grade drainage system to perform most efficiently for the soils on site. The evocative forms of the house are oriented to capture daylight and views to the stunning mountain peaks above, but also act to effectively shed snow from the massive storms that move through the area.”

AIA 3 Park Passive Solar photo1

Park Passive; Seattle 

NK Architects

“This home’s ‘passive survivability’ lies in its ability to capture and retain heat. In the instance of a power outage during the winter, the indoor air temperature would remain steady significantly longer than a traditionally built house without the opening of doors and windows. The home is built to passive house standards and is the city’s first to be certified by the Passive House Academy. By creating both vertical and horizontal spatial connections, the design maximizes the shallow floor plate. This home celebrates affordability through conservation and a reduction in monthly utility bills. It serves as a showcase that living in an energy efficient home is comfortable too.”

AIA 4 Sol Duc cabin

Sol Duc Cabin; Seattle 

Olson Kundig Architects

“The owner desired a compact, low-maintenance, virtually indestructible building to house himself and his wife during fishing expeditions. Composed of two levels, the cabin’s entry, dining and kitchen areas are located on the lower floor while a sleeping loft with minimal shelving hovers above. A cantilevered steel deck extends from the lower level, providing unimpeded views of the river. Most of the structure; the steel frame and panels, the roof, shutters, and stairs were prefabricated off-site, thereby reducing on-site waste and site disruption. The cabin’s rugged surface and raw materiality respond to the surrounding wilderness while its verticality provides a safe haven during occasional floods from the nearby river.”

AIA 5 Topo House

Topo House; Wisconsin

Johnsen Schmaling Architects

“Echoing the dramatic surface deformations that occur when wind blows over the crops and grasses of the surrounding prairie, the building skin, a high-performance ventilated rainscreen system with concrete fiber panels, is organized by 190 individually shaped, black-anodized aluminum fins of interrelated contracting and expanding shapes. Depending on the time of the day and the angle from which they are viewed, the fins create a constantly changing veil whose shifting geometry subverts the volumetric simplicity of the house itself. The house is built around a palette of sustainable and highly durable materials and features an envelope that is designed to endure the continuous onslaught of the Midwest’s severe weather conditions and extreme temperature fluctuations.”

Tomorrow we will look at multifamily structures. Thanks to these architects and property owners for expanding the design landscape for American architecture.

Source: AIA

 

The post AIA Top 10 New Homes – Part I appeared first on Green Building Elements.


 

 

 
 
 

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