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Toronto Achieves the “Impossible”

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Apr 30, 2013 01:10 AM
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by James Glave last modified Apr 29, 2013

For several months, through my work at Clean Energy Canada at Tides Canada, I have been compiling Clean Energy Review, a weekly digest of 10 clean energy transition updates from across Canada and around the world. I am going to attempt to cross-post this digest here each week. This week, a major accounting and consulting firm [...]




 

 

For several months, through my work at Clean Energy Canada at Tides Canada, I have been compiling Clean Energy Review, a weekly digest of 10 clean energy transition updates from across Canada and around the world. I am going to attempt to cross-post this digest here each week.

This week, a major accounting and consulting firm goes deep, the Canada Green Building Council extends a welcome hand to charities, and Mark Jaccard gives Alberta an earful over its carbon pricing policy.

1. A KPMG TREASURE TROVE: In a comprehensive new report, the consulting firmdeclared that this will be a busy year for clean energy investors and developers. We learned quite a bit reading this. So will you.

2. IT PAYS TO CUT CO2: The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions askedClimateSmart to assess the impacts of carbon-cutting measures undertaken by nearly a dozen B.C. companies. No surprise: They slashed costs and rapidly recouped investments.

3. TORONTO TAKES KYOTO: Ottawa pulled out of the Kyoto Accord last year, having once pronounced the target “impossible.” We presume nobody told the City of Toronto, which just cut more than twice as much carbon as Kyoto required.

4. ALBERTA RIPE FOR WIND: Canada could have as much as 22,500 megawatts of installed wind capacity by 2021, with Ontario leading the pack. Alberta is poised to steal the second-place spot from Quebec, a new forecast concluded.

5. TWO FOR THE GEARHEADS: A pair of clean-energy trends stood out in this year’s edition of MIT Technology Review Breakthroughs: Supergrids for renewables and ultra-efficient solar power.

6. ENERGY-ENVIRO CROSS-BORDER COMBO: Canadians and Americans think their respective governments should combine environmental and energy departments, star pollster Nik Nanos said, flagging potential for an “energy strategy for the continent.”

7. BIOENERGY SUCCESS OUT WEST: The B.C. Bioenergy Network awarded itselftop marks for creating revenue and jobs. Since 2008, some $16.6 million of project funding has leveraged about $123.5 million worth of clean investments in the province.

8. A NEW ENERGY FUTURE FOR CANADA: The Conference Board of Canada released “Energy Futures for Canada” a set of four plausible energy futures in 2050. Scenario two, aka Green Machine, bears closest resemblance to our New Energy Vision for Canada.

9. RETURN OF THE ACCIDENTAL ACTIVIST: Economist Marc Jaccard roastedAlberta’s carbon-pricing regime: “One way for climate policy to fail is by having none. Another is to have… policy that looks to have more effect than it actually does.”Caution: Contains ultra-wonky content.

10. GREEN FOR ALL: The Canada Green Building Council said it would make affordable green buildings even more so by waiving the LEED certification and registration fees that it normally charges charitable projects.

If you would like to  like to subscribe to Clean Energy Review, please do so here.


 

 

 
 
 

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