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Heating With Wood Pellets

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Oct 25, 2012 01:01 AM
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by Alex Wilson last modified Oct 24, 2012

Author name:  Alex Wilson Blog Category:  Energy Solutions GreenSpec Insights What to like and what not to like about pellet stoves and pellet boilers. Our Quadrafire pellet stove, which we can operate even during a power outage. Click to enlarge. Photo Credit: Alex Wilson We have a sort-of love-hate relationship with our pellet stove. My wife leans more toward the latter, while I see the benefits outweighing the negatives. In this column I’ll outline the primary advantages and disadvantages of pellet heating. Advantages of wood pellet heating Regional fuel. The fuel is—or can be—local or regional in origin. At a minimum it’s not fuel that’s coming from places where they don’t like us—like the Middle East. When I’m buying pellets, the source is a significant consideration. I’m willing to pay slightly more to have my pellets come from nearby plants in Jaffrey, New Hampshire or Rutland, Vermont. Carbon-neutral. The life-cycle of wood pellet production and use can—and should—be close to carbon-neutral. With natural gas, propane, or heating oil we’re taking carbon that was sequestered underground millions of years ago and releasing that as a greenhouse gas into the atmosphere (where it contributes to global warming). When we burn wood pellets we’re still releasing about the same amount of stored carbon into the atmosphere, but that carbon was sequestered in the wood fiber over just a few decades, and if we’re managing our woodlands properly (replacing harvested trees with new ones) the entire life cycle results in almost no net carbon emissions. read more




 

 


 

 

 
 
 

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