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Repurposed Parts for a Repurposed Berkley, CA House

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 26, 2012 01:01 AM
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by Glenn Meyers last modified Jan 25, 2012

Designed by husband and wife team Karl Wanaselja and Cate Leger of Leger Wanaselja Architecture, the upper outside walls of the house are made from over 100 salvaged car roofs. According to the architects, the roofs were sawed out of grey cars left for parts in local junkyards. The lower walls are clad in poplar bark, a waste product from the furniture industry of North Carolina. And the awnings are fabricated from junked Dodge Caravan side windows.




 

 

Here is where neighbors can say, “Meet the car roof house.”

Designed by husband and wife team Karl Wanaselja and Cate Leger of Leger Wanaselja Architecture, the upper outside walls of the house are made from over 100 salvaged car roofs. According to the architects, the roofs were sawed out of grey cars left for parts in local junkyards. The lower walls are clad in poplar bark, a waste product from the furniture industry of North Carolina. And the awnings are fabricated from junked Dodge Caravan side windows.

The two-bedroom house, located in one of Berkeley’s oldest residential neighborhoods, provides a great-looking example of what can be accomplished using recycled materials. Wanting to build a house that utilized green technologies and reused materials, the couple obtained car roofs from a selection of gray-colored cars that had been left for parts in local junkyards in Berkeley, California.

The residential building also features lower walls clad in poplar bark, a waste product from the furniture industry of North Carolina and unique awnings fabricated from junked Dodge Caravan side windows. What was once “America’s bestselling minivan” is now a common junkyard item, according to the couple.
As reported by gizmag, the curved exterior walls give the impression that the house is smaller and shorter than an average two-story home. “However the interior boasts wide-open spaces, high ceilings and large open windows.”

From the perspective of energy, the structure uses solar to deliver electricity and heat hot water most of the year. A back-up electrical system relies on the grid during rain or heavy overcast periods.

The house was built using resource-efficient and low-toxicity materials including concrete that contains 50% fly ash cement, is colored with natural earth pigments and is sealed with soy-based binder from Soycrete. All insulation is blown-in cellulose except under the concrete slab and the interior doors feature wheat board cores. All wood furnishings throughout the home (including the deck railings) are from locally salvaged wood, and the wooden floors are polished with a plant resin floor finish from Bioshield.

 

Photo: Leger Wanaselja Architecture



 

 

 
 
 

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