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Would it help the heating bills and the comfort level of my house to have the walls on the north side insulated?

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 08, 2013 01:00 AM
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by last modified Jan 07, 2013

My house was built in 1916. It has lathe and plaster interior walls, and cedar board siding on the exterior walls. Due to the age of the siding, I've been told the only way to insulate the exterior walls is to drill holes in the siding. I've never seen this technique used where you couldn't see the multiple plugs, even after painting. I could live with the ugliness of the plugs in the back of the house, if it would make those north-facing rooms more comfortable, but I've been told this wouldn't work. Any thoughts?




 

 

My house was built in 1916. It has lathe and plaster interior walls, and cedar board siding on the exterior walls. Due to the age of the siding, I've been told the only way to insulate the exterior walls is to drill holes in the siding. I've never seen this technique used where you couldn't see the multiple plugs, even after painting. I could live with the ugliness of the plugs in the back of the house, if it would make those north-facing rooms more comfortable, but I've been told this wouldn't work. Any thoughts?

Joan,

Any improvement in insulation will make a difference in comfort and energy costs if areas of need are addressed.

Most comfort problems, in a cold weather state, are the result of...


 

 

 
 
 

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