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Bringing The Invisible to Life

by James Glave last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:10 AM
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by James Glave last modified Sep 21, 2010

As part of the research I'm doing at the Tides Canada Energy Initiative, I took out a couple of hours to harvest some data from Environment Canada's 2008 greenhouse-gas emissions inventory. I uploaded it to Many Eyes, and published it as a dynamic bubble chart visualization. It reveals how our provinces and territories stack up on the various categories of energy-related carbon emissions.




 

 

Until you can put it work, data is just racks of dull numbers tucked away in obscure tables. That’s why I’ve always been a fan of visualizations. Recently, a friend introduced me to IBM’s Many Eyes site. As part of the research I’m doing at the Tides Canada Energy Initiative, I took out a couple of hours to harvest some data from Environment Canada’s 2008 greenhouse-gas emissions inventory. I uploaded it to Many Eyes, and published it as a dynamic bubble chart visualization.

The chart reveals how our provinces and territories stack up on the various categories of energy-related carbon emissions. I love that Many Eyes allows us to take something invisible and sinister—namely, planet-cooking greenhouse gases—and bring them to life as big happy bubble balloons.

Here’s how it looks. This embedded chart below just shows one category — buildings and construction. The full interactive visualization is here. (Can you guess where most of Canada’s fossil-fuel-production emissions originate?)


 

 

 
 
 

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