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Form; The Reason for Architectural Design

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 02:08 AM
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by Jennifer Shockley last modified Oct 08, 2011

Form in architecture can take on many roles. Sometimes a building or object is designed to represent another object or to act out nature’s principles. The definition of form is as vast as the examples that can be given to demonstrate its importance in design. Form is stated as the shape and structure of an object, the essence of something or the mode in which a thing exists, acts or manifests itself.




 

 

Form in architecture can take on many roles. Sometimes a building or object is designed to represent another object or to act out nature’s principles.

The definition of form is as vast as the examples that can be given to demonstrate its importance in design. Form is stated as the shape and structure of an object, the essence of something or the mode in which a thing exists, acts or manifests itself.

M.C. Escher Figure Ground

In the schematic design phase form can be represented as figure ground drawings. These are black and white drawings that present a new interpretation of how the object plays in the space that it occupies. A figure is brought forth which may not be easily noticeable and everything else gets pushed away as the background or ‘ground’ of the image. One of the most commonly known images that represent figure-ground illusion is the two faces with a vase by M.C. Escher.

This play on space is the beginning to designing buildings that are their own play on creativity. Four examples are:

  1. The Rainbow House
  2. The Opera Garnier Restaurant
  3. The Education City Convention Centre
  4. The Harajuku Protestant Church



 

 

 
 
 

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