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Here’s to Hydration

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Sep 14, 2012 01:01 AM
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by Jennifer Shockley last modified Sep 13, 2012

Pennsylvania American Water is the largest water utility in the state of Pennsylvania which provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.2 million people. They recently, on September 6, 2012, announced their newest social media campaign. This campaign invites consumers to post pictures of themselves using reusable water bottles




 

 

I’ve never understood the reasons behind buying cases of bottled water for in-home use. Maybe I don’t associate with this because I grew up in Colorado, as a farm and country girl, where when you were thirsty you would just turn on a hose or faucet and drink.

I’ve also lived in a house in Wyoming where the tap water was undrinkable because of the sulfur from underground springs. This made me more appreciative of the goodness of the water we have right here and most places throughout this country that is conveniently right at our fingertips whenever we want it.

I know some people will only drink bottled water and I have heard all of the frightening stories of what can be found on public drinking fountains but really is that more scary than our world being overtaken by garbage, such as plastic bottles, at an alarming rate?

So when I come across a company that is promoting the use of tap water, I have to celebrate a little and pass on the information.

The Company is Pennsylvania American Water which is a subsidiary of American Water.

American Water was founded in 1886 with its headquarters located in Voorhees, New Jersey. The company employs more than 7000 people and they provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to approximately 15 million people in more than 30 states and parts of Canada. One of the branches is the Pennsylvania state branch.

Pennsylvania American Water is the largest water utility in the state of Pennsylvania which provides high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.2 million people.

They recently, on September 6, 2012, announced their newest social media campaign. This campaign invites consumers to post pictures of themselves using reusable water bottles. You can share a picture on Pennsylvania American Water’s Facebook or Twitter page through October 15, 2012 of you and your use of reusable water bottles in action. Participants should post their photos on the company’s social media sites at www.facebook.com/pennsylvaniaamwater or www.twitter.com/paamwater.

The company will send the first 500 participants a free water bottle encouraging more use.

This campaign is not only for the encouragement of the use of tap water and social medias but is also emphasizing:

  • Important water service information and emergency notification
  • Updates on water and wastewater construction projects
  • Information on customer programs, community events and environmental initiatives.
  • Conservation and watershed protection tips

“We are encouraging Pennsylvanians to declare and celebrate their choice of tap water over bottled water by showing us reusable water bottles in action,” said Terry Maenza, Pennsylvania American Water director of communications and external affairs. “By choosing the convenience and low cost of tap water, customers can easily and inexpensively fill and refill their water bottles for about a penny per gallon.”

Research, the key to backing up any side of an argument, has been conducted by Pacific Institute for Studies in Development Environment and Security in Oakland, California. They show that bottled water consumes as much as 2000 times more energy than using tap water.

“Just think. For the cost of one gallon of bottle water, most individuals could pay for their entire day’s tap water needs for drinking, cooking, bathing and more.”

Unrecycled Water Bottles

Also, Doug James at Cornell University has put together an animation of the water bottles that go to waste each year so that people can really understand the numbers. He discusses that since its recent popularization, bottled water has become one of the most consumed, yet least recycled beverages.

In 2005 approximately 30 billion water bottles were purchased in the United States and only about 12 percent of those were recycled. That leaves behind about 25 billion (yes that’s a B) left behind, from one year.

I find that statistic horrifying and I hope this campaign and research continues to influence more people to turn on the tap. This will decrease wasted money but also the wasted plastic that is constantly adding to our landfills.

Resources: Cornell, American Water and Business Wire



 

 

 
 
 

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