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Micro-Housing: Future of Urban Living

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Apr 16, 2014 01:01 AM
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by Dawn Killough last modified Apr 15, 2014

SCADpad micro-housing experiment transforms Atlanta parking structure into a sustainable community for artful living The Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) recently unveiled SCADpad, a unique micro-housing and adaptive reuse experiment that transformed the parking structure of its midtown Atlanta location into a sustainable community that proposes an answer to the world’s growing urban housing The post Micro-Housing: Future of Urban Living appeared first on Green Building Elements .




 

 

SCADpad micro-housing experiment transforms Atlanta parking structure into a sustainable community for artful living

SCADPadThe Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) recently unveiled SCADpad, a unique micro-housing and adaptive reuse experiment that transformed the parking structure of its midtown Atlanta location into a sustainable community that proposes an answer to the world’s growing urban housing challenges.

SCADpad was designed and developed by an interdisciplinary SCAD team of 75 current students, 37 alumni and 12 SCAD professors from 12 academic degree programs. The experimental community features:

  • A work station built by SCAD furniture design students, featuring a hands-free intuitive 3D printer interface, which allows any SCADpad resident to issue a print command to create wall attachments without pressing a single button.
  • A community garden watered with filtered greywater from one of the SCADpad units and fed by a fiber optic sun harvesting system and high-efficiency composting systems.
  • A waste management center for recycling, composting and trash disposal dubbed NuBox. The NuBox is constructed of reclaimed wood and teaches residents to view traditional waste management as nutrient management.
  • A park featuring custom-designed furniture from SCAD students that helps to transform the uninhabitable parking deck into a livable space inspired by nature.

Each of the three fully functional and fully furnished 135-square-foot SCADpad units fit within a standard parking space. The SCADpads showcase custom art installations from SCAD alumni on the interior and exterior of the micro-homes to create three design themes inspired by SCAD locations around the world: Asia, Europe and North America.

  • SCADpad Asia: Intended to reflect the culture and aesthetic of SCAD’s Hong Kong location, SCADpad Asia features a striking physical exterior designed by SCAD painting alumnus Will Penny (B.F.A. and M.F.A.). Inside the unit, the walls are lined with geometric wallpaper overlaying a soundboard, also called human conductive wallpaper. When you touch the wallpaper, randomized musical sounds fill the space.

SCADPad Asia

  • SCADpad Europe: SCADpad Europe was inspired by the medieval landscape and history of SCAD Lacoste. Designed by SCAD fibers alumna Trish Andersen (B.F.A.), the exterior of the SCADpad features tonal blue lacquered wood panels resembling travertine tiles, and scalloped copper tiles that border the roof. The inside of SCADpad Europe is adorned with interactive fiber walls woven from 40,000 pieces of fabric. Maximizing the small space, this SCADpad includes a fold-up hammock bed, which accommodates a desk underneath.

SCADPad Europe

  • SCADpad North America: Reflecting the American spirit of self-determination, SCADpad North America has a minimalist paint treatment on the exterior. The interior includes two felted gray walls made by SCAD students and other surfaces featuring tiny leather strips affixed in a Navajo pattern and rendered in a classic, American palette. This installation was created by Marcus Kenney, a SCAD photography alumnus (M.F.A).

SCADPad North America

“Parking structures are a unique and very recent building type,” said Christian Sottile, Dean of the School of Building Arts, SCAD. “It’s not a structure that cities, architects and designers have examined as opportunities for urban living.”

“Parking structures are cold, uninhabitable spaces built for cars, not humans,” said Sottile. “At SCAD, we see many of these 20th century structures as a huge adaptive reuse and historic preservation opportunity to bring art and design together to delight the user and sustainably evolve these buildings already in place.”

Source: PR Newswire

Photos courtesy of: SCADpad

The post Micro-Housing: Future of Urban Living appeared first on Green Building Elements.


 

 

 
 
 

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