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help... siding

by Ken King last modified Oct 18, 2012 06:29 PM
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help... siding

Posted by Ken King at August 29. 2006

so my house is ready to side. almost. i was originally hoping to go rainscreen with hardi panel, or minerit, but have decided that there are a few too many unanswered questions out there and i'm not comfortable attacking that one myself. plus, i'm seeing some local homes that have done it and its started to warp, quilt, etc... and i'm not eager to reside in 2 years.
so, i thought metal. we are using metal on the roof and thought i could probably do the metal siding myself. still an option.
before i order a bunch of metal and get going, i thought i'd post the question. are there other options out there that i should be looking at? i cant afford parklex or any of the really cool crazy stuff out there. it would be great to have someone else do the work for me, but i'm not even sure where to look to find a siding contractor that will work on a modern house and know what he/she is doing.
any help or insights?
-ken

Re: help... siding

Posted by psmodern at October 03. 2006

We are replacing our stucco with Cembonit in a rainscreen application. It's cheaper than Parklex. Each 4 x 10 Cembonit panel screws into furring strips over building paper. The warranty is ten years. Check http://www.cbf11.com/ for details.

There is a place in Sycamore Ave in Phinney Ridge done in 'Flint' colored Cembonit and it looks great.

Cembonit?

Posted by marja stowell at October 17. 2006

I hate to pry, but what was the price per square foot on the Cembonit? I've been thinking of using it but can't seem to rfind any actual figures anywhere.


Modern in Shhhh.. Shelton

Re: help... siding

Posted by Matthew Mueller at December 27. 2006

This post is maybe too late but I received some pricing on both the Cembonit and the Minerit board. These prices include the boards, the rubber EPT strips you install between the boards and the furring strips, and the stainless steel fasteners.  Shipping, from KY, however, is not included.

If you have other questions, either Harrison or Homer at the company are extremely helpful.

Cembonit

¼” = $3.70 sf

5/16” = $4.09 sf

 

Minerit

 ¼” = $2.58 sf

5/16” = $2.90 sf

 

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at March 12. 2007

I am facing a similar dilemma.  We are renovating and building an addition to a home.  Our architect designed the addition to be sided with Cembonit with Parklex accent panels.  We loved the design, but now the GC is coming back with pricing significantly above what we had expected.  Now we're pondering a change to a HardiePlank system, because apparently the rainscreen is a major part of the cost, and HardiePlank would avoid that.  I hate to give up the Cembonit and Parklex, but our budget may require it.  We're already WAY over budget!  The Cembonit and Parklex gave the design a distinct modern flair, and I'm concerned the Hardiepanel will make it a little mundane. 

Re: help... siding

Posted by richierod at March 13. 2007
Julie - I would suggest that the switch from Cembonit to Hardi is not going to make as big an impact on your budget as a switch from Parklex to ANYTHING else. Parklex is really expensive. You might consider swithing to 1x6 T&G; cedar siding instead, and perhaps moving from Cembonit to Minerit (although no big price difference there). For pics of T&G; cedar siding in a modern context, check out the weeHouse website. http://www.weehouses.com/ (Re-reading your post I find that you'll be using the Parklex as accents.....) Also, I have a friend who recently completed an addition to his house and used HardiPanel. He just nailed it to the sheathing, and then painted it with a flat paint. It looks good, particularly from a distance where the nails disappear..... his method of installation saved time and money, although it will not accomplish the same thing as a rainscreen. Hope this helps. -R.

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at March 15. 2007

Thanks for the suggestion.  Our architect had suggested the T&G cedar as well, however we are relunctant because of the maintanence required.  Our location is waterfront on Puget Sound with lots of wind, rain and salt water.  That's why we choce cemobint and parklex to begin with, this stuff is bulletproof.  I'm feeling ok with a change to Hardieplank from cembonit.  my current spec house has it and it has held up beautifully.   But as far as the parklex accents goes, i think we will stay the course.  Our GC thinks we'll only save about 3K going to T&G so we'd rather cough it up now for the parklex than have to maintain cedar for the rest of our lives. 

Re: help... siding

Posted by richierod at March 15. 2007
I'm definitely with you on the no maintenance thing. My house, which I'm building now, will use Galvalume siding, Minerit HD, and stucco with integral color. I'll never spend a day painting. Sweet. Wish I could afford Parklex. ;) -R.

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at March 22. 2007

Well, we decided to stick with Cembonit and Parklex afterall.  The T&G cedar wasn't a significant cost savings over Parklex, and the Hardieplank option instead of the Cembonit only came in a few thousand less...and you have to have it painted every 5-10 years.  So we axed the hardieplank and stuck to the original design.  I'm relieved, because I love the look of the Cembonit and parklex and I think it will look spectacular when done.  But that's a long way off.  we haven't even broken ground yet.

Julie

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at March 30. 2007

Wow!  Great looking house!  That is the exact color scheme we are going for in our place as well.  Is that T&G cedar on the protuding section?  Cembonit does appear to be getting more use in the Seattle area.  Our architects (Coop 15) are using it in several of their projects.  You can see the designs for our place at this website: http://www.coop15.com/houses/PovertyBay.htm#

The colors are off, but you get the idea.  We break ground May 1.  I'm excited to get started after a year and a half in design and planning.

Julie

Re: help... siding

Posted by psmodern at March 31. 2007
That's a great looking design. I've admired a couple of Lane Williams houses. The one he designed in Kirkland which sold recently for $2.5m was stunning and I must have driven past it a dozen times. If only it had been on the market in 2005...

I will say that the huge amount of vertical and horizontal lines in Cembonit makes for slow construction, especially for a remodel where the building is never square. Our construction team is going pretty slowly but they are real perfectionists which is great.

Here is a closeup that shows the stained cedar and Cembonit. I believe the Cembonit requires at least a 1/8th of an inch gap. The cedar is being done in a similar rainscreen application. The screws are stainless steel Torx type. The look is definitely 'machine in the garden' rather than something that blends with the landscape. All of the screws make it stand out from the surroundings. We also considered Parklex but it blew our budget so we went with cedar since it looked really great on another of Jim's houses on Capital Hill. Budget was definitely an issue for us. This entire project was an unexpected remodel because we purchased a modern stucco house which turned out to be in pretty bad shape once we moved in.
 
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Re: help... siding

Posted by Mark Mayer at April 10. 2007
Julie, Just brousing through the site and found your comments. I build cabinets in Seattle and think that I am doing your job. I do a great deal of Lane's work and bid on this job a couple of months ago. I haven't heard back from the GC yet though. This should be a wonderful house! Mark

Re: help... siding

Posted by moderntoronto at April 17. 2007
I too am planning on using Cembonit and have received a quote for the materials shipped up to Toronto that is right in line with the other prices mentioned above - approximately $6 - $6.50 p.s.f. including shipping, duties, taxes. Can anybody who has used it give an rough number on cost p.s.f. to install?

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at April 23. 2007

Previously Mark Mayer wrote:

Julie, Just brousing through the site and found your comments. I build cabinets in Seattle and think that I am doing your job. I do a great deal of Lane's work and bid on this job a couple of months ago. I haven't heard back from the GC yet though. This should be a wonderful house! Mark

Mark,

Great to meet you!  Joe didn't specify who was doing the cabinet work, but I assume you're the man!  I'm really looking forward to getting going on this. 

Julie

Re: help... siding

Posted by psmodern at August 14. 2007
A forum member asked me for some pointers on Cembonit so I thought I'd also post them here as well. We are about 95% done with our remodel after nearly a year and it is starting to come together finally. I'll post some more photo's soon. We are very happy with the Cembonit and it seems really robust. We had some cedar stain leak onto it and it scrubbed off fine so we are anticipating a long life. The geometric look is great, and the flint color varies with the sun - sometimes light, sometimes very dark. It looks wonderful When we ordered a second batch, it was a slightly different color and we had to send it back. Make sure your builder orders enough for the entire job and track the batch numbers. We also had one shipment where it was broken on delivery, but the manufacturer (www.cbf11.com) took care of it.

Re: help... siding

Posted by richierod at August 15. 2007
I recently built a house using Minerit HD as the siding in a rainscreen application. It's basically the same as Cembonit. I used 4x10 sheets. It looks great, but the installation was tricky. The stuff is no maintenance for sure, but you are putting up a finish material, and you must pay close attention to the installation. You must clean off dust, fingerprints and any other marks right away. I used a red scotch brite pad - it worked great. As far as the dust is concerned, you must cut this stuff with a masonry blade, and you must use a vacuuum as you are cutting. Otherwise it is NASTY. I can't imagine cutting it in an enclosed room with a dust mask..... ow. psmodern,your contractor definitely went the extra mile for you. An important detail to know is that - in a rainscreen application - the manufacturer wants the Minerit to be held off the wall a minimum of 3/4". Metal hat channel is commonly used as the material to hold off the Minerit and it is commonly only found in 7/8". So when you combine the thickness of the hat channel and the Minerit and the butyl strips that you use between the hat channel and the Minerit (assuming 1/4" Minerit), you are talking 1 1/4" away from the framing! Important when you are considering window/siding intersections and vent/siding intersections, etc. That said, I wouldn't side my house with anything else, and the rainscreen works awesome here in L.A. The house doesn't get nearly as hot as the stucco boxes around here, and what heat it does pick up is dissapated quickly. I know lots of folks around here that have their dinner outside so as to avoid their hot house..... not us! Someday, when my punch list nears one page, I'll post pictures...

Re: help... siding

Posted by Pat Lukes at September 26. 2007
psmodern: The photo is awesome and the work looks perfect. I live in LA and am looking for someone to install Minerit inside of my house. I've chosen it because you can paint it. Has anyone used Swisspearl? I'm very drawn to the red color they have.

Re: help... siding

Posted by Pat Lukes at September 26. 2007
Update: After finding this blog last night, I googled Finland and Parklex and visited them today in Santa Monica. I got samples of everything. I was speechless. If I have to beg, borrow and steal to use this product in my next house, I will do it. The quality, the colors, the possibilities. Some things you just have to splurge on and this is one of them.

Re: help... siding

Posted by Todd Thackray at October 21. 2007

 We are having a Lane Williams remodel done and have specified Hardipanel in a rainscreen application.  The contractor is balking at the prospect, in particular when it comes to painting.  Spraying would leave a stripe on the vapor barrier at each panel gap, and he doesn't like the idea of pre-painting before installation.  It would involve a lot of staging on a small site and he is also worried about dirt and damage on the finish. 

I found some pre-painted Hardipanel on the website: Jame Hardie.  Any thoughts on using this product?

Here is a link to the project: Coop15.

I'm hoping to get a much less expensive installation than Cembonit, but still have the same look and durability.

Re: help... siding

Posted by Julie M at October 23. 2007

Previously Todd Thackray wrote:


 We are having a Lane Williams remodel done and have specified Hardipanel in a rainscreen application.  The contractor is balking at the prospect, in particular when it comes to painting.  Spraying would leave a stripe on the vapor barrier at each panel gap, and he doesn't like the idea of pre-painting before installation.  It would involve a lot of staging on a small site and he is also worried about dirt and damage on the finish. 


I found some pre-painted Hardipanel on the website: Jame Hardie.  Any thoughts on using this product?


Here is a link to the project: Coop15.


I'm hoping to get a much less expensive installation than Cembonit, but still have the same look and durability.


Hi Todd,

Love the design! Of course, we have similar taste choosing Coop15 for architecture.  I think I've seen your design pics at their office. 

We also considered doing Hardie panel, but decided to stick with Cembonit since we really wanted to avoid having to ever paint the house.  I looked at that James Hardie site...do they panels really come pre-painted or just primed?  Our previous house had Hardieplank siding and it came primed a dingy beige color, but had to be painted.  It's quality siding and the paint held up well over 5 years.  Still, we're excited about using the cembonit and the distinctive look it makes.

Your contractor's concerns are valid ones.  You may need to consider the added time and labor it would take to pre-paint and install the Hardie panel vs. cembonit or other siding.

Have you started construction yet? Best of luck!

Julie

Re: help... siding

Posted by Ted Olsen at October 09. 2012
The Cedar siding looks great.  Do you know how it was installed?  Are these just 1x6 planks without milling or are the lap and gap / shiplap?
 
 
 
Previously psmodern wrote:
That's a great looking design. I've admired a couple of Lane Williams houses. The one he designed in Kirkland which sold recently for $2.5m was stunning and I must have driven past it a dozen times. If only it had been on the market in 2005...

I will say that the huge amount of vertical and horizontal lines in Cembonit makes for slow construction, especially for a remodel where the building is never square. Our construction team is going pretty slowly but they are real perfectionists which is great.

Here is a closeup that shows the stained cedar and Cembonit. I believe the Cembonit requires at least a 1/8th of an inch gap. The cedar is being done in a similar rainscreen application. The screws are stainless steel Torx type. The look is definitely 'machine in the garden' rather than something that blends with the landscape. All of the screws make it stand out from the surroundings. We also considered Parklex but it blew our budget so we went with cedar since it looked really great on another of Jim's houses on Capital Hill. Budget was definitely an issue for us. This entire project was an unexpected remodel because we purchased a modern stucco house which turned out to be in pretty bad shape once we moved in.

 

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