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Hardipanel Photos and Resources

by marja stowell last modified Jul 27, 2011 02:21 AM
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Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by marja stowell at September 23. 2006

Since Hardipanel is so versatile and there is sucha lack of information out there I am hoping to start a thread with photos of different types of installations, tips on how to install and resources for fasteners, trim and adhesives. Please add to this. Thaks Marja

Seamless Hardipanel with silicone sealant

Posted by marja stowell at September 23. 2006

This was pulled from:
http://www.ochshorndesign.com/practice/04-01/week/41-45/41-45.html


Top-down construction. The scaffolding is built higher as each successive floor is constructed; i.e., new brackets are fastened to the top of the plywood sheathing that has just been completed, new spaced columns are fastened to the tops of the existing spaced columns, new beams are inserted between brackets and columns, and new (or reused) 2x12 planks are placed above the beams. In this way, plywood sheathing can be fastened from new scaffolding as the structure gets higher and higher. However, because the scaffolding is attached through the sheathing into the studs of the addition, it is not possible to leave the scaffolding in place while the siding is installed.


Temporary wooden spacer is inserted below z-bar flashing, helping to support siding panel to be installed above.

Normally, one would start the siding (or shingles) from the bottom and work up, since the upper pieces are designed to overlap the lower ones in order to provide a water-shedding profile. Even with vertical siding panels (such as the Hardipanel cement-board siding I am using), it is usual to place z-shaped flashing along the top surface of the panels before installing the panel above, so that water cannot enter through this horizontal joint. Since this method is not possible with a scaffolding system that is fastened into the building itself, I designed a construction method that would allow for top-down installation of the siding panels. In this way, I could install the uppermost level of siding from the scaffolding, paint that level of siding from the scaffolding, and then remove the top level of scaffolding in order to begin the same process for the siding immediately below. To do this, it was only necessary to install the z-bar flashing at the bottom, rather than the top, of the siding panels. The next row of panels is then inserted up into the flashing. Aside from the advantage of being able to use the scaffolding both going up (for the sheathing and Tyvek air barrier) and then coming down (for the siding and painting), this method also protects the building from water intrusion as the siding is being installed.

 
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Re: Hardipanel how-to

Posted by RJ R at September 30. 2006

Can someone explain hardipanel installation to me once more. I have a new garage with OSB on the studs. I plan to put #15 felt on the OSB, and then 4x10 hardipanel smooth sheets on top of that. My two big questions are :
1) how to attach the hardipanel to the garage. The spec sheet says use a nail gun and set the pressure settings so it doesn't go in too far, but I don't really trust this method. Can I screw it in? And do they need to be predrilled? And the studs aren't perfectly aligned to do a nice stainless screw pattern on the sheets, so can I just screw it where studs are and use silicone caulk over top then paint?

2) What are my options for in between the panels. This is just a 10' high garage so there is only one story (one layer) since I plan to stand them up tall. But should I just leave a little gap in between and caulk it? and what if I want a grid look, can I leave the gap or use some kind of aluminum channel in between? And where do I get the aluminium/metal channel?

Thanks. I've read through old hardipanel posts but I guess I just need someone to break it down for me since this is my first hardipanel attempt.

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Splatgirl at September 30. 2006

First recognize that there is no actual formula here...we're all outside the established fiber cement box, so there is some degree of make an educated executive decision required on your part.

1. There are hardipanel-specific screws that are self tapping so you wouldn't have to predrill. I'd use these if I was going to cover them anyway. Silicone caulk WONT hold paint, so def. don't use this. Check the spec sheet or online, because I'm pretty sure I recall it saying what to use to fill nail/screw holes. If you do use caulk, make sure it's paintable.

2. Hardi's spec's say to caulk the joints, so I would do this regardless based on your desribed application. If you want to add a metal feature, you could either surface apply it, like battens using flat stock over top, or get some kind of profiled piece that sits in whatever width gap you leave. You can pretty much get any profile you'd want bent up at a sheet metal shop, or you could look for something you like that's avaliable from places like Fry Reglet. Even check out what a local lumber co. (not HD or big box) has for aluminium channel. You may find something you like there, but again, you may have to re-purpose something.

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by RJ R at September 30. 2006

Thanks! I think I recall hearing that you should not used galvanized nails/screws in hardipanel. Do you all use stainless? I found some stainless self tapping screws that might work, although they're not cheap.

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Frank Jones at September 30. 2006

I'm covering my whole house in hardipanel. What do you want to know? Though, be advised that I only know what little they tell you on the james hardie instal guide.

But I will say this:
you have to special order it and it takes a while.

finding the z-bar flashing was a pain. It turns out you can special order that at lowes but good luck trying to schedule anything with them. tamlyn makes the vinyl coated z bar flashing. It's more expensive than your regular 5/8 z bar. You have to go to lowes with the specific tamlyn product #

I'm using a coated exterior screw. One kind works better than another. You have to test them out. Then I am using exterior spackle to coat the screw holes. Two coats.

You do see the vertical joints.

It does seem like james hardi just threw the product out there without much support. I think they see it as good for a board and batten application or for gable ends way up high. There is an idea that you can get a stucco finish for less money and an easier skill set with hardi panel. I would say it is what it is and it's specific unto itself. We are still waiting for a really great installation of hardi panel.

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Frank Jones at September 30. 2006

they do have a roofing nail that is ring shanked. Maize?

the only problem I might see with your install is if your hardi panel joints line up with your OSB joints. If the osb has been left exposed for a while there might be some swelling that will translate out to your hardie joints.

I would do a test and call around for some h-channel.

It's not that much different than 1/4 hardie backer board. That would be easy and less expensive to do tests with.

You won't find the information you need on the web. You have to see it.

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Tom Granese at December 26. 2006

We used 4' x 10' smooth Hardipanel (brick pattern) on our townhouse project and used a rainscreen application to attach them over Tyvek.  Treated 1 x 4 on the outside every 24" in vertical strips from foundation to roof.  It works very and we have received a lot of compliments on the style.  It was nailed using a nail gun set to a controlled level so as to not countersink into the panel.  We then had the building painted and it looks better.  I will try to put some more pics of the more complete project (which is only a few weeks from completion) in the Big D Modernists forum.

Here is a photo of the install and one close up.

Application:  http://www.urbandomicile.com/web_006.jpg
Close up:  http://www.urbandomicile.com/web_007.jpg

- Tom

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Tom Granese at March 01. 2007

Okay, we have added some pictures of the finished product on our website.  Check out the slideshow to see.

http://www.urbandomicile.com/eastside

Thanks,

Tom

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Julie Weiss at May 12. 2007

Previously Tom Granese wrote:



Okay, we have added some pictures of the finished product on our website.  Check out the slideshow to see.



http://www.urbandomicile.com/eastside


Thanks,


Tom


Hi Tom,

What material did you use on the front elevation (the gray walls)?  Is it stucco?  Also, did you paint the Hardipanel prior to putting it up or just after?

Thanks!

Julie

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Britton K at May 13. 2007
Hi (first post). Thinking about putting new siding on my house using Hardipanel but thought I might try it first on a studio/shed. I like the look of the the panels used on the Modern-Shed: http://www.modern-shed.com/studio.html ...but wanted to find out how they achieve the gapped look if anybody knows? Looks like batten and board but horizontal. Thanks, Britton

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by Krista Atkins Nutter at May 20. 2007

We used 4x8 and 4x10 smooth HardiPanel on our house and shed.  On the shed, we butted vertical joints and used stock z flashing from Lowe's on the horizontal joints.  On the house, we butted vertical joints and left a 1/4" gap on the horizontals.  The house siding is installed over a rainscreen technique, the shed siding is applied directly to the OSB with 15# felt.  We used exposed stainless hex-head screws for both.  You can see some in-progress photos at www.nutterresidence.blogspot.com  Thanks!

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by diane duffey at October 27. 2010

can you post some close up pic's of the screws? How has the look held up over time?

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

Re: Hardipanel Photos and Resources

Posted by brano rataj at October 28. 2010
here is our installation. we used nails as we didnt want to see any fasteners. nailed flush and painted. 
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