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flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

by diane duffey last modified Jan 24, 2013 01:15 AM
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flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by diane duffey at July 30. 2007

I'm looking into what interior doors can be installed flush to drywall -- without needing moulding to finish the frame. I see this mostly in commercial applications, and am seeing it more in modern residential. We'd love advice on what doors can be installed this way, what framing and finishing techniques are used. We are interested in aluminum door frames, only because we've not seen it in wood door frames.


Are there any interior door companies you recommend for modern doors? Any in the US? I've found one in the UK, another in Italy...


Many thanks!

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by Eric Reinholdt at July 31. 2007

Previously diane duffey wrote:


I'm looking into what interior doors can be installed flush to drywall -- without needing moulding to finish the frame. I see this mostly in commercial applications, and am seeing it more in modern residential. We'd love advice on what doors can be installed this way, what framing and finishing techniques are used. We are interested in aluminum door frames, only because we've not seen it in wood door frames.




Are there any interior door companies you recommend for modern doors? Any in the US? I've found one in the UK, another in Italy...




Many thanks!


I like Mohawk's flush doors for my projects: http://www.mohawkdoors.com/2006SpecPDF/2006SpecPages.aspx , see the Architectural Series.  Choose a solid core door, you'll be much happier with the weight and feel of it.  I live in Maine and they're readily available through my lumberyard.  They purchase through A.W. Hastings / Brosco, I believe they're a nationawide distributor.  As for the hardware, a very basic pivot hinge like a Stanley extra heavy pivot is my default, http://www.hardwaresource.com/Store_ViewProducts.asp?Cat=515 .  Not a lot of flash here, basic and affordable ($39 pr.)  If you have cash to burn, I consider Rixson's pivot sets among the best for this type of application.  You don't need a frame of any sort really, we typically rough out the opening, return the sheetrock at the jambs and head and depending on the hardware you end up with (latchset / ballcatch / rare earth magnets) you may need a stop (to keep the door from swinging beyond 90).  You can fashion all of these items that would normally comprise a prehung door frame out of finished lumber, poplar, rock maple, your choice.  Good luck...

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by Ed at August 09. 2007

For my house I purchased pre-hung interior doors (simple, solid flat-panel Jeld-wen doors in birch) that were intended for 2 x 4 framing.  However, all of my interior walls were framed with 2 x 6, which meant the doors were slightly undersized, thereby giving me room to put in sheetrock returns.  However, admittedly, it was rather painful to get the sheetrock returns to look decent against the wood door jamb- lots of mesh tape and spackle involved.

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by Ryan Williams at August 09. 2007

I'm a Project Manager for Rimadesio Boston (Italian glass door manufacturer). There are many frame options for flush or near flush door frames.

I'm not sure if I'm allowed to post this information but I'm just trying to help out! :)

http://www.rimadesioboston.com

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by diane duffey at August 10. 2007

Thanks so much Ryan. These do look lovely. I'll give you a call.

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by Gene Seguin at August 16. 2007

Hi Diane -

Not sure if you're starting from scratch with new construction or whether you're working on a remodel with existing doors and jambs in place.

If new construction, I'd echo another post that recommends pre-hung doors (always get solid core) that are undersized (ie. 2x4 jambs inside 2x6 framing). 

If you're doing a remodel (like I am) you might consider running another layer of sheetrock on top of your existing drywall. It might seem excessive but double layers of drywall are common in commercial construction (for firecode but it goes a long way towards deadening sound).

In either case, have the drywall installers run the sheetrock just over the door jamb and then cover the raw cut edges with paper-edged metal corner trim. This clever material accomodates the two most common thicknesses of drywall: 1/2" and 5/8". Just trim off the paper edge you don't need and make sure to use enough mud to avoid bubbles. Latex caulk will take care of any minor cosmetic work when it comes time to paint. Taking this no-trim approach is more labour intensive but if it were easy/cheap, everyone would do it. However, this approach allows you to use off-the-shelf pre-hung doors which are reasonably priced.

The end result sets the door 1/2" back from the finished drywall with just smooth, uninterupted lines. Give some thought to your baseboard trim and how it will interact with the trimless doors. On that note, I've also seen no-baseboard trim walls with sheetrock finished at the bottom (about 1/4"-3/8" off the finished floor) using the same corner bead approach I've described here.

Best of luck!

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by diane duffey at August 19. 2007
Thanks so much for the suggestions. We are remodeling, so no new construction, but we're expecting to take the house down to the studs, which does give us some flexibility.

I spoke with a contractor this week about this. He recommends that we use Fry Reglet U-channel to terminate the drywall. After some research on the website, I think this is the one he's referring to ...

http://www.fryreglet.com/shape/pop/135.htm

We are concerned with doubling up the drywall due to weight concerns, but your suggestion does make sense to me.  Again, many thanks for the feedback.



Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by adam may at August 27. 2007

I'm remodeling a mid century modern home, and it had the kind of doors you are talking about.  Originally, I loved the look of the doors... but now, I decided to replace all of them with JEld-wen singlke panel shaker style doors... with a square cut simple molding.  I found the flushmount a little odd looking after i lived with it for a while.  The doors were almost too minimalist, if that makes sense.  Just some food for thought...

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by Jason at August 27. 2007

Does anyone have any photos they can post to link to?

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by diane duffey at August 28. 2007

Here's a website that I've just found that features these doors...


http://www.portarredo.com/files/index.cfm?id_rst=201&lingua=en


if you go to their gallery tab, you'll see more examples of this type of installation. I'm sure these doors are outside our price range, so we're looking for ways to implement this look without importing doors/hardware from overseas.


 
 
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Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by JohnC at August 30. 2007
You should be able to use any pre-hung door for what you want as long as the width of the jamb is the same as your studs plus the drywall on each side. Since you will not be using typical door trim, make sure you mount your doorjambs very securely. Typically the door trim adds strength to the doorjamb, but you will have to rely entirely on the nails and shims used to mount it. Trim-tex makes some inexpensive trim details. We just built a house and used their #5508 trim to give a ½” shadow line around the doors. This stuff is plastic and easy to work with. You should probably use some foam or something to fill the gap between the doorjamb and the stud since this type of trim will allow you to see a sliver of light in some places where it meets the jamb(typical trim spans the doorjamb and the wall and prevents this). Also, this type of trim is a pain to paint/finish unless you paint the shadow area and part of the doorjamb the same color. John

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by diane duffey at August 31. 2007
Thanks so much John. Would you happen to have any pictures that you can post? I'd love to see how it turned out. best, di

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by JohnC at September 05. 2007

Here are a couple of pictures. The door has not yet been finished, it needs to be sanded and varnished. It is kind of hard to see in the pictures, but the edge of the doorjamb is flush with the drywall. The trim creates a ½” x ½” shadow line around the doorjamb.

 

John

 
 
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Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by John Smith at July 25. 2010

Hello,

I really liked the way you did your door, maybe you should change you door handles, to stainless steel door handles, to improve the look of it. There is beautiful modern door hardware online at http://www.contemporary-door-hardware.com , they have stainless steel doorbells button, modern door handles, modern door stopper made from stainless and rubber, and all kind of contemporary accessories .

 

 

Re: flush installation of interior doors (no frame moulding) -- need specs and advice

Posted by davidraju at August 06. 2012

There are many interior doors for flush installation. my project who worked at watsolecomcepts will help you in this.

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