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1st post, introduction

by Lawrence Naughton last modified Jul 18, 2012 05:25 AM
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1st post, introduction

Posted by Lawrence Naughton at August 23. 2005

We bought a 50 year old rancher in Cherry Hill which originally was 2 bedrooms. Sometime in the 70's a third bedroom a great room were grafted on the back. We've become less happy with this arrangement/design and now are wondering what our options are. The house is a question but the lot backs up to a creek and as the old saw goes, they aren't making those anymore. We think about building up or on or even knocking down. We started to look at modular/panelized construction as a cost saver liked the modern designs we saw better than the traditional. I joined the board to see if others had dealt with similar issues if so how.

Re: 1st post, introduction

Posted by Gregory La Vardera at August 23. 2005

Welcome Inaughton, you will find some remodeling project blogs started here, but they have not been any of the hot and heavy blogs. You could re-post your question to the Dwell Labs topic which may gain more eyes than the Delaware Valley regional forum. Post a picture or two with it and people will be sure to share ideas.

One bit of advice I have is to go to the Cherry Hill planning office now and ask them to check the wetland's status for your lot. Bring your site survey with the lot and block number. I had a client on a creek off of Cropwell and it turned out the wetland transition zone extended into their yard, so it delayed them a year. They had to make application to the DEP and have an official come out and delineate exactly where the line fell and were not allowed to build into it (even though there were pre-existing patios that had already disturbed it.) Crazy, but better to find out now.

Re: 1st post, introduction

Posted by Lawrence Naughton at August 23. 2005

Thanks, we've wondered about wetlands issues wondered where to start. We may have a similar situation.

However, I joined here to get some tear down ideas. We see some remodeling being done in the neighborhood (Erlton) that does'nt look like it makes financial sense. There's an article in the current issue of Forbes on tear downs one of the comments is that a lot of older houses in established neighborhoods are simply obsolete and that's what I wonder about our house. In the last 5 years we've put in new windows, put in a new heater and added central air. We have a partial basement (not dry) and part crawl space (dirt floor) which is less than ideal. As I understand it foundation costs are significant but that there are panelized solutions that can mitigate that. What I don't know is if we have to pull out everything start from scratch (my hunch) or if there is some less costly way to proceed. Enuff for tonite from me. If you have any thoughts, please post.

Re: 1st post, introduction

Posted by Gregory La Vardera at August 23. 2005

I am quite certain that you will spend more on a tear-down than even an extensive remodel. Whether that makes sense for you or not depends on how long you will stay there, and the market in your neighborhood. If you stay then you leverage your investment over a greater amount of time and enjoy the investment you have made. If values in your neighborhood are high then it can make more sense to do a tear down. This is something we only used to see at the beach here, but now its happening in Haddonfield and Moorestown as well. There is no clear answer here if you will stay as opposed to flipping the property on spec. If you are in for the long term its as much an emotional question as a financial question.

Re: 1st post, introduction

Posted by davidraju at July 18. 2012

Hai I am david and new to this forum site. This just for saying hello to all of you

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