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Modern Designer

by Jeff Kalm last modified Nov 15, 2012 09:16 PM
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Modern Designer

Posted by Jeff Kalm at August 18. 2005

I don't know if this is truly the correct place to post this, but I am starting my own residentail design practice in Minnesota. I will be doing custom designs, remodels, landscapes and anything else that comes my way to start with. If there is anyone out there that is in need of any service please feel free to email me at jeff_kalm@hotmail.com. Once I get more things set I will post that information.

Thanks,
Jeff

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Jeff Kalm at November 07. 2005

Just want to bump this back up to top for people to see. I am making progress and am able to take on work if there is any interested people out there.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by canyc at November 08. 2005

i have a very random question for you.

i'm building a modern home and i'm trying to decide to go with 8' ceilings or 9' ceiling on the second floor in the bedrooms.

do you think 8' bedrooms would be a mistake?

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Jeff Kalm at November 09. 2005

It all depends on the feel you want. I have 8' ceilings in my current room, and in my remodeled bedroom it will be 7'4. the lower the ceiling height the more intimate the room feels. So to answer the question in a long about way, I would do 9' ceilings pretty much every where else but in the bedrooms i would go down to 8'.

Re: ceiling height

Posted by Chas. Schwartz at November 09. 2005

I found this thread only minutes after getting off the phone with my architect. One of the subjects of the call has to do with the ceiling/roof height on a section of our new vacation house in-the-planning. Original concept: half the house has 8' ceiling heights, half 10'. There were various reasons to the difference, but my original idea was that using 8' and 10' means there is less labor time and less materials waste because they are easy to arrive at using standard materials, such as 4 x 8 gyp board etc. It looks like one option we have to resolve the issues here is to raise the high side slightly, for example from a ceiling height of 10' to 11'. This may turn out to be the best option but at the start I am cool to it because it will mean more cost due to more complication in building, such as extra measuring and cutting on site (part of the concept is to design the house so it can be built very fast, thus saving labor costs) and also more materials waste. So, these practical aspects are very much in my mind today and perhaps you should think about these things, too. Low ceilings also conserve heat and higher ones can give it a place to go above your head, so there is also an issue based on your climate and how you would like the building to perform in a passive sort of way. When you visit very old New England houses,such as Paul Revere's house in Boston (1600s) they all had very low ceilings to help keep them warm in the cold winters; OTOH in hot climates it can be more comfortable if the hot air rises above the occupants, especially if there's a system for venting it via convection.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Jeff Kalm at November 10. 2005

pottree,
I agree with you on the height issue. In building new, or designing a new home I have always looked at the building material sizes available, it would never make sence to have a ceiling height of say 7'10. then not only are you cutting 2 from every sheet of drywall but you are also cutting down all the studs, so in the end the cost is the same but you wasted twice the material and paid for that waist to boot.
so why does your architect feel the need to raise the room from 10' to 11'? I live in northern Minnesota so as nice as tall vaulted spaces are they are not the most cost effective way to go here. Hope you project goes great and look forward to seeing some pictures on the forums on construction commences.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Chas. Schwartz at November 17. 2005

Part of the concept for the difference in roof heights is to promote air circulation and cooling by convetion in our desert environment. We have very strict regulations here in CA, expecially for energy calcs. In order to have the building meet these requirements the plan is to super-insulate it so that we can have more and larger windows; with conventional construction and insulation, you can't really get away with more than about 16% of the total floor area as the amount of window glazing, which is much too little. This means the flat roofs will need to be about 12 thick so we can cram in more R value (the plan is to use foam with a very high R rating of about 7 per inch giving us 2 - 3 times the minimum required R value). There is also a requirement for a 1/4 rise per foot on a flat roof for drainage. This means that when you add together the roof thickness plus the rise on the low side, there is a difference of only about 8 between the top of the low roof and the bottom of the high ceiling, which is not enough for the clerestory windows we want for light and ventilation between the two, so it seems now the answer is to raise the high side. One foot would be enough but we may possibly make it 2 because that would make better use of the materials and labor plus keep everything on a more aesthetically pleasing module (the house is based on a 4' module). So this is how the difference between adjoing 10' and 8' ceilings in CA works out to be only 8! A final decision has not yet been made but we're creeping up on it. The vacation house is very small, so there is also the issue of whether 12' ceilings on the high side would be way out of proportion to the smallish size of the rooms on that side. Film at 11.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by John Smith at August 02. 2009


Hi all,
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They distribute brands like Valli and Valli, FSB, and many stainless steel door handles suppliers.

We don't usually think about door hardware, but once installed you realize the value that these stainless steel door hardware added to any home or office.
It is a great thing to change before selling a home; home buyers pay attention to details, so with these modern hardware, the details will be here.

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This process is great you should look at the categorie wood wall panels : http:linkto wall panels.com

http://www.dayorishardware.com

 
 
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Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Azula at March 21. 2010

There are many good modern designer that offer attractive interior designs services and I'm glad to consult with them.

__________________

traditional beds

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Matt Kent at June 27. 2011

Do modern designers work with timber or are they most likely to favor modern materials such as brick veneer or concrete?

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Michael Kitchens at July 11. 2011

It’s great that a designer like you is offering your services here! This is a wonderful place to start off with. I would like to ask if you have had any experience in designing modern kitchens? I just bought a house recently but I am fretting over the design of the kitchen as I am so attracted by the various designs and don’t know where to start.

Michael

http://www.kdcuk.co.uk

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Harvey at November 02. 2011

One factor that modern designers have to take note of is not to sacrifice the practicality of internal plumbing works for the name of design. You have to make sure that the plumbing is efficient, to avoid blocked drains, while implementing your modern designs.

Harvey - http://www.highlanderplumbing.com.au

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Monica Thomson at November 25. 2011

Previously Harvey wrote:

One factor that modern designers have to take note of is not to sacrifice the practicality of internal plumbing works for the name of design. You have to make sure that the plumbing is efficient, to avoid blocked drains, while implementing your modern designs.

Harvey - http://www.highlanderplumbing.com.au

 

I totally agree. Modern designers tend to do that though and unfortunatelly convince also people they are working for that the practicality has to be sacrified in the name of design.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by JW Wall at December 21. 2011

Modern designers now have more tools and designs to work with. They can also incorporate modern technology and conveniences into their designs to make a futuristic feel.

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by sabulbab0 at October 16. 2012
Previously Jeff Kalm wrote:

I don't know if this is truly the correct place to post this, but I am starting my own residentail design practice in Minnesota. I will be doing custom designs, remodels, landscapes and anything else that comes my way to start with. If there is anyone out there that is in need of any service please feel free to email me at jeff_kalm@hotmail.com. Once I get more things set I will post that information.

Thanks,
Jeff

Re: Modern Designer

Posted by Cathy Dawkins at November 15. 2012

What kind of [url=http://www.smithe.com] modern furniture[/url] do you specialize in?

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