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If I acted as GC during construction, about how much $$ might be saved?

by tom mot last modified May 24, 2005 03:38 PM
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If I acted as GC during construction, about how much $$ might be saved?

Posted by tom mot at May 10. 2005

As I try to peer into the future and estimate the projected budget for our first home, I can't help but wonder how much we might be able to save by acting as our own General Contractor. I know savings can be substantial, but I haven't seen any real numbers. So, would anyone care to provide a very general ballpark figure on what sort of savings we might expect if we went the GC route in Austin, TX. Here's a hypothetical scenario:

Building a modest sized home (think Mark's courtHOUSE) within Austin city limits, on a flat infill lot, likely using SIPs. We probably won't perform any actual construction labor ourselves, except for possibly painting and finishing the floors. Not sure what else to add, but that's the basic idea.

If we can save enough doing this it might allow us to focus more on getting a good location, and/or allow us more flexibility in our design and finish options, which would be a great bonus.

Thanks!

Re: If I acted as GC during construction, about how much $$ might be saved?

Posted by Mark Meyer at May 10. 2005

Usually a GC charges about 20% of the construction cost for management. It can vary wildly though. With thoughtful design, aimed at keeping things simple for the trades involved, you may see more savings than that, and a smaller aspirin bill.

Mark

Re: If I acted as GC during construction, about how much $$ might be saved?

Posted by Universal Constructor at May 24. 2005

Hi Strain.

Why not hire Mark to design and GC the project?

Someone should compile all the scenarios they cut out of those home design shows so anyone considering GC'ing a job themselves will have a real idea of what is involved in design and construction.

You are going to have plenty of ideas about changing, modifying, enlarging your project as you go along - and many will benefit from having your Architect or Designer involved in order to advise you why something might not be a good idea - which is not to mention how much coin a good Architect or Designer will save you when it comes to finalizing a budget and eventually cutting checks.

I would think of it like knee surgery. Bring your Architect or Designer on board when you select your lot, let him come up with a strategy of operations - then let him start cutting and sewing. And don't stick your hands in there unless you're all in agreement. ; )

Sincerely,

Jonathan

 
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