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The Robot and the Architect are Friends

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 03:10 AM
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by Geoff Manaugh ( last modified Mar 06, 2011



[Image: The architect and his construction robots by Villemard].

In 1910, French artist Villemard produced a series of illustrations depicting what life might be like in the year 2000.

While you can see a wide range of the artist's predictions in this Flickr set, the above image, of an architect and his robotic construction crew, seemed worth highlighting.

In an article published last summer in Icon, called "The Robot and the Architect are Friends," Will Wiles wrote that Swiss architects Gramazio & Kohler "have a vision: architecture using robotics to take command of all aspects of construction. Liberated from the sidelines, the profession would be freed to unleash all its creative potential—all thanks to its obedient servants, the robots. But first, architects must learn the robots’ language."

[Image: Courtesy of Icon].

It all sounds deceptively easy at first: the architects have merely to program their robotic arm "to pick up a brick and place it, and then to repeat the process with variations. When this program runs, the result is a wall."
    The machine itself moves with the clipped grace we associate with robotics, performing neat, discrete actions that contain within them an assortment of fluid swivels and turns. These quick-slow, deliberate movements are hypnotic. It’s beautiful to watch but, because it moves in a way that looks animal while being unlike anything we know in nature, there’s something in it that’s inescapably unnerving.
Given multiple robots, sufficient bricks, complex instructions, and enough time, "extraordinary forms" can result, patterned and pixellated, brick-by-brick.

[Image: "Pike Loop" (2009) by Gramazio & Kohler].

"Considering the revolutionary potential of their work," Wiles writes, "you might expect a note of utopian zeal from the pair." He quickly adds, on the other hand, that, "if you want dazzling Wellsian predictions, delivered with glittering eyes, of future armies of architect-controlled mechanoids transforming the world, you’ve come to the wrong place." Gramazio & Kohler's vision is, instead, "understated, modest, [and] reasonable."

Nonetheless, some combination of Villemardian enthusiasm—airborne tennis!—with rigorous architectural robotics, and perhaps even with emerging new brick designs and a new generation of 3D printers, is an enticing vision to pursue for the future of building construction.

(Villemard image originally seen via Selectism, thanks to a tip from Jon Bucholtz. Earlier on BLDGBLOG: Flying Robotic Construction Cloud).




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