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Project Sanguine and the Dead Hand

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 03, 2013 01:06 AM
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by Geoff Manaugh (noreply@blogger.com) last modified Jan 02, 2013



 

 

[Image: One of the stations of Project ELF, via Wikipedia].

Further exploring the radio-related theme of the last few posts, Rob Holmes—author and co-founder of mammoth—has pointed our attention to something called Project Sanguine, a U.S. Navy program from the 1980s that "would have involved 41 percent of Wisconsin," turning that state into a giant "antenna farm" capable of communicating with what Wikipedia calls "deeply-submerged submarines."

Each individual antenna would have been "buried five feet deep" in the fertile soil of the Cheese State, the New York Times explains, creating a networked system with nearly 6,000 miles' worth of cables and receiving stations.

The Navy was hoping, we read, for a system "that could transmit tactical orders one-way to U.S. nuclear submarines anywhere in the world, and survive a direct nuclear attack." This would "normally... require an antenna many hundreds of miles in length," according to the NYT, but Naval strategists soon "realized that a comparable effect could be achieved by using a large volume of the earth's interior"—that is, "looping currents deep in the Earth"—"as part of the antenna." The hard and ancient rock of the Laurentian Shield was apparently perfect for this.

[Image: From Roy Johnson, "Project Sanguine," originally published in The Wisconsin Engineer (November 1969)].

In other words, the bedrock of the Earth itself—not a mere island in the Antarctic—could be turned into a colossal radio station.

A similar system, installed for preliminary tests in North Carolina and Virginia, "apparently flickered lightbulbs in the area and caused spurious ringing of telephones," like some regional poltergeist or a technical outtake from Cabin in the Woods.

At least two things worth pointing out here are that a "scaled-down version" of Project Sanguine was, in fact, actually constructed, becoming operational in the northern forests of Michigan and Wisconsin from 1989-2004; called Project ELF (for Extremely Low Frequency), it arrived just in time for the Soviet Union to collapse...

[Image: Inside Project Sanguine; photo from Roy Johnson, The Wisconsin Engineer (November 1969)].

...which brings us to the second point worth mentioning: a strangely haunting program known as "The Dead Hand," a doomsday device constructed by the Soviet Union.

In his Pulitzer Prize-winning book of that title, historian David Hoffman writes about a (still active) weapon of retaliation. The "Dead Hand" was built such that, if nuclear field commanders ever lost touch with military leaders back in Moscow during a time of war, a constellation of cruise missiles would automatically launch. This would happen not in spite of a lack of living military leaders, but precisely because everyone had been killed. That is, a machine would take over—thus the name "dead hand."

Each cruise missile, however, flying over the lands of the USSR, would emit launch commands to all of the missile silos it passed over. Missile after missile would soon soar—thousands of them—arcing toward the United States, which would soon be obliterated, along with the rest of the world, in a nuclear holocaust controlled and commanded by nothing but preprogrammed machines.

In any case, Project Sanguine was its own version of an end-times radio, an "immense subterranean grid" transmitting to distant submarines by way of the Earth itself, humans using an entire planet as an apocalyptic radio device.

 

 

 
 
 

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