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by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 04, 2012 03:03 AM
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by Eric last modified Jul 15, 2011

As part of the Taliesin Centennial Celebration, the program “Democracy in the Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright: Celebrating Milestones of Taliesin, Jacobs I, and the First Unitarian Society Landmark Meeting House” will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, August 20, 2011. Details after the jump... The concurrence of anniversaries of Taliesin, the First Unitarian Society’s building, and the Usonian house provides the opportunity to celebrate Wright’s dedication to architecture that ennobles American democracy through building for...




 

 

Picture 6 As part of the Taliesin Centennial Celebration, the program “Democracy in the Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright: Celebrating Milestones of Taliesin, Jacobs I, and the First Unitarian Society Landmark Meeting House” will be held in Madison, Wisconsin, August 20, 2011. Details after the jump...

The concurrence of anniversaries of Taliesin, the First Unitarian Society’s building, and the Usonian house provides the opportunity to celebrate Wright’s dedication to architecture that ennobles American democracy through building for families and communities that can “lift the common into the uncommon.” 

The Unitarian Meeting House is marking the sixtieth anniversary of its completion (designed 1947, completed 1951). Frank Lloyd Wright, when asked to design a modest meeting house for a small congregation, said he tried to express an “over-all sense of unity” bringing form, philosophy, and nature together.  The result—with soaring roof, natural materials, and interlocking geometry—is a majestic building with flexible gathering spaces built from local materials using simple techniques. 
The Herbert Jacobs House (designed 1936, completed 1937), marking the seventy-fifth anniversary of its design, was Wright’s first completed residence based on Usonian principles. The Usonian plan was Wright’s idea for a truly American architectural style—affordable and easy to build. It featured an open interior, radiant-heated concrete floor with scored unit grid, natural lighting, and exposed wood, brick or stone inside and out.

The 11 am to 5 pm program will be hosted at the Unitarian Meeting House. Following the opening session and lunch, participants will be given a tour of the structure and then tour the Jacobs House and one of the Wright-designed Erdman homes on Anchorage Avenue before reconvening at the Unitarian Meeting House for a panel discussion led by Wright scholars. For additional information, visit here and here.

Image via taliesinpreservation.org



 

 

 
 
 

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