Personal tools
log in | join | help
Sections

Formaldehyde: here’s the thing

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jun 05, 2014 01:09 AM
Editorial Rating: 1 2 3 4 5
Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)
by becky last modified Jun 04, 2014

It’s everywhere! Remain calm. Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring compound that is basically all around us in varying amounts, from the planet’s surface to its atmosphere and out into interstellar space. To learn more about it, here’s a link to the Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde   It’s also used heavily in no-iron clothing material and is […]




 

 

Formaldehyde MoleculeIt’s everywhere! Remain calm.

Formaldehyde is a naturally occurring compound that is basically all around us in varying amounts, from the planet’s surface to its atmosphere and out into interstellar space. To learn more about it, here’s a link to the Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formaldehyde

 

It’s also used heavily in no-iron clothing material and is present in a LOT of the foods we eat:
http://www.cfs.gov.hk/english/whatsnew/whatsnew_fa/files/formaldehyde.pdf

It sounds like the trouble starts when it gets combined with other compounds to make resins & glues, which is why it has been regulated so closely in the last 10-15 years. There are innumerable other products it’s used to make as well, both inside & outside the construction industry.

Besh cabinets do use California compliant materials, which have the strictest regulations in the US, but does not use 100% formaldehyde free *anything*. You can read the consumer FAQ on the California Air Resources Board page at this link: http://www.arb.ca.gov/toxics/compwood/consumer_faq.pdf  The short version is, there is no such thing as 100% formaldehyde free plywood.

All that being said, the best info I could find in response to health concerns is this one from Joel Hirschberg, Green Building Supply Center in Fairfield IA on the Green Home Guide:
http://greenhomeguide.com/askapro/question/how-long-does-it-take-for-oil-based-wood-stain-minwax-to-finish-off-gasing

From that response, basically, applying an encapsulated sealer is the best thing that can block formaldehyde outgassing.

The challenge with all the risk minimization is twofold:

1) Sensitivity levels vary from individual to individual, so a certain level may not affect one person as much as the next. And because formaldehyde is so ubiquitous, it’s difficult to isolate the source, even with an allergy patch test.
2) There is significant added cost for products that minimize outgassing, both in terms of labor (to apply multiple coats of AFM safecoat for example) and materials (specialty produced bamboo or other exotic woods, for example).

My guess is that outgassing is less of a concern in older homes because they aren’t as tightly enclosed as new ones.

Not a black & white easy answer, but there it is.


 

 

 
 
 

Website migration, maintenance and customization provided by Grafware.