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Fractal Structures Could Yield Ultralight 3D-Printable Beams That Are 10,000 Times Stronger Than Steel

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Dec 01, 2012 01:05 AM
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by Beth Buczynski last modified Nov 30, 2012


If you were to strip away the walls, floors, and insulation, you’d see that most buildings are constructed on a frame of beams. Most beams are made from steel, and while strong, they’re fairly one-size-fits-all. A new study published in the journal Physical Review Letters found that fractal patterns could be used to create 3d printed beams [...]




 

 

University of Nottingham, UK, Yong Mao, 3D printing, steel, construction, building materials, material science, resin

If you were to strip away the walls, floors, and insulation, you’d see that most buildings are constructed on a frame of beams. Most beams are made from steel, and while strong, they’re fairly one-size-fits-all. A new study published in the journal Physical Review Letters found that fractal patterns could be used to create 3d printed beams that are lighter and up to 10,000 times stronger than typical steel beams! This combination of material science and 3D printing technology could make it possible to customize beams for a specific load and purpose, reducing waste and cost.

University of Nottingham, UK, Yong Mao, 3D printing, steel, construction, building materials, material science, resin University of Nottingham, UK, Yong Mao, 3D printing, steel, construction, building materials, material science, resin


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