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Below, buried beneath the very roots of the trees

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Aug 02, 2012 01:04 AM
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by Geoff Manaugh (noreply@blogger.com) last modified Aug 01, 2012



 

 

[Image: Piranesi's Rome].

Peter Ackroyd's allusion to a landscape comparable to the tropical swamps of Borneo found in the sewers of London reminded me of a brief line in Gilbert Highet's book Poets in a Landscape.

Describing the origins of Rome, a city built on the Tiber River, Highet writes that the landscape there was once as wild as any to be found on earth—indeed, offering evidence that writers seem consistently to fantasize of finding a new tropics in the very ground of Europe, Rome was founded in "those early idyllic days, when the Tiber was as primitive as the Upper Amazon today."

Highet goes on to describe the city's long-term devolution into the "heap of ruins" it became in the Middle Ages, a city "earth-choked, mutilated, silent," one where weeded streets were lined with "the titanic palaces of later monarchs—arches which now look not so much like relics of human architecture as fragments of mountain-ranges into which dwellings have been built."

"In those days," Highet writes, a variant form of "primitive" landscape emerged, one in which forests returned and plants ran riot, when "Rome was a place of grassy ruins and elegant palaces and whispering melancholy churches, little changed from the strange half-visionary city immortalized in the engravings of Piranesi: tall pillars standing among rocks and mounds which prove to be the fallen walls and earthquake-shattered arches of some vast mansion; huge fields in which a few peasants stand gossiping while their goats scramble among carved pilasters, and which are at a great distance revealed as being, not fields, but the overgrown floors of temples and baths; lonely obelisks once designed to perpetuate some Roman glory, and now purposeless, mighty circular tombs converted during the Middle Ages into fortresses; hills which covered buried palaces." The ruin, here, "earth-choked, mutilated, silent," could thus be seen as a vertiginous act of misrecognition: architecture mistaken for the surface of the earth.

Even the supersized spatial affectations of someone like Emperor Nero, Highet continues, could not ultimately resist the inhuman pull of insects and vegetation that settled onto Rome: "so many centuries after Nero shocked his contemporaries by insisting on making a private landscape in the midst of a crowded metropolis, the ruins of his palace have gone back to nature. Bees hum through the roofless corridors; flowering weeds flourish among the imperial brickwork; from the sunlight above we hear the voices of children running and laughing on the grassy slopes."

Highet was writing nearly half a century ago, but it's still accurate that, as he writes, visitors to the city are able to "feel the ephemeral happiness of summer flowers and summer birds all around, to enjoy the fresh warm air and the genial quietness, and to reflect that below, buried beneath the very roots of the trees, clogged with hundreds of tons of earth and fallen masonry, shrouded in the darkness of many disastrous centuries, there lie some of the foundations of our world"—foundations built and implanted when the region was "Amazonian" in its humid and unsettled wildness.

 

 

 
 
 

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