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by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 12, 2012 01:04 AM
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by Geoff Manaugh (noreply@blogger.com) last modified Jan 11, 2012



 

 

[Image: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai, via Archinect].

Archinect is currently featuring a project called "White Elephant (Privately Soft)" by Jimenez Lai.

Lai describes it as "a building inside a building," falling "somewhere between super-furniture and a small house." It's a flippable object, able to be tilted and set on any side. It tumbles, in the architect's words, its cowhide-padded interior offering a place to sit in any orientation.

[Images: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai].

I'm basically just posting this here as eye-candy, but there is something awesomely compelling about the notion of super-furniture: hypertrophied spatial objects that are more like portable rooms, perfectly inhabiting the otherwise inexact and under-explored midspace between architecture and a bed or couch, between a house and the ergonomic equipment that fills out.

In fact, the sight of this thing looming all alone in an empty room makes it seem more powerful than it really is, I'd suggest, as it appears, in many ways, to invalidate the walls around it. In other words, why use the walls at all—why even furnish your own apartment—when you can just drop two or three of these white elephants inside it, perhaps lit from within, completing the space with their bulk? Your "bedroom" becomes spatially and materially coextensive with the bed itself.

[Images: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai].

It's a thus a kind of instant room you throw into your house, like spatial jacks, an inhabitable in-between, or burrow space, that both divides the place it sits within and defines an interior of its own.

[Images: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai].

There are more photographs on Archinect showing the spatial object being flipped, as the following, truncated sequence demonstrates—

[Images: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai].

—and Lai's diagrams reveal the variety of facets the project requires.

[Images: "White Elephant" diagrammed, by Jimenez Lai].

But it would also be interesting, given more time, to see many more spatial variations on the same basic idea, but also to explore the effect of different materials, finishes, and colors. Imagine building out a family of these objects the way you might build a BMW or specify a Mini Cooper. You select the geometry, the interior, the upholstery—maybe even small, medium, or large—and soon enough your very own piece of super-furniture arrives, ready for assembly.

[Images: "White Elephant" by Jimenez Lai].

See more at Archinect.

 

 

 
 
 

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