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Appliances: Wall Radiator Roundup

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Jan 19, 2012 11:59 AM
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by Janet last modified Jan 18, 2012

In Europe, radiators are the embodiment of quiet, gentle warmth and sleek architectural style. Why haven't they caught on in the US, you may ask? Radiators have been dinged by a bad reputation: They used to be clunky, hissing pieces of iron that took up valuable space. Modern wall-mounted (sometimes called wall-panel) radiators are well-designed, quiet, and efficient. They still work essentially the same way as old-fashioned radiators, circulating hot water through pipes to heat the surrounding air, but new models have a vastly increased surface area for giving off heat and operate at a much lower, energy-efficient temperature. And they don't stir up dust like central forced-air systems. An alternative to space-consuming ductwork, they can be used to retrofit an old house and can easily be added to bathrooms and kitchens using existing plumbing. Price-wise, radiators can be a little more expensive than installing a forced-air system, but the energy savings make up for the cost difference over the long term. Baseboard units are generally the most efficient for heating, but panel radiators are more architecturally pleasing. Here are a few of our favored options; we'd love to hear about your experience with modern radiators. N.B.: Most of the products listed here are also available in floor-mount and baseboard options, and come in a range of finishes and colors. Above: Founded in 1953, Swiss company Runtal touts its combination of engineering expertise and architectural design; its Runtal Arteplano Radiator is shown here in anodized aluminum. Contact Runtal USA for specifications and pricing. Above: The Runtal Jet-X Radiator Panel heats up a room quickly, with air gaps between the flat tubes, and can be mounted horizontally or vertically; contact Runtal USA for more information. Above: The Runtal RX Radiator features slim oval tubes, reducing the visual mass of the unit; contact Runtal USA for more information. Above: Canadian company Jaga offers the Tetra Radiator and other models in the US; find a dealer on the Jaga website. Above: Belgian company Vasco makes the Arche Radiator , available in horizontal or vertical configurations. Like many of the radiators shown here, it can also be outfitted with towel rails, towel rings, and robe hooks. In the US, the Vasco Arche line is available through Hydronic Alternatives . Above: Canadian company Carisa Design Radiators offers the Aden Radiator , shown here in stainless steel.




 

 


 

 

 
 
 

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