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Frank Lloyd Wright School Of Architecture Reaches Financial Goal

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Dec 24, 2015 01:04 AM
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by Eric last modified Dec 23, 2015

The news was announced yesterday afternoon that the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture successfully raised the $2 million dollars it needed in pledges before the end of the calendar year to operate as a stand-alone and wholly independent organization from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Read more details about it after the jump... From the press release: The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture has reached an important milestone on its path towards independence...




 

 

6a00d8341bf72a53ef01bb07a4b59c970d-800wiThe news was announced yesterday afternoon that the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture successfully raised the $2 million dollars it needed in pledges before the end of the calendar year to operate as a stand-alone and wholly independent organization from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation. Read more details about it after the jump...

From the press release:

The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture has reached an important milestone on its path towards independence by raising more than $2 million in cash and pledges, the Chair of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Board of Trustees, Alanna Mack, and the Chair of the School Board of Governors, Jacalyn Lynn, announced today. The School is seeking to become an independent subsidiary of the Foundation to comply with new accreditation regulations that require it to be financially and administratively independent. In collaboration with the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, of which the School is currently an operating division, the School has sought to raise the funds to demonstrate its financial independence.
 
The Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture continues the legacy of the apprenticeship program Wright started in 1932 at his home, Taliesin, in Spring Green, Wisconsin. Now co-located at his winter home, Taliesin West, in Scottsdale, Arizona, the School is an operating division of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, which exists to “preserve Taliesin and Taliesin West for future generations, and enrich society through an understanding of Frank Lloyd Wright’s ideas, architecture, and design.” The Higher Learning Commission (HLC) in 2011 changed its by-laws and no longer accredits schools that are part of larger institutions with multi-faceted missions. In reaction, the School and the Foundation developed a path for the School to become a financially and administratively separate subsidiary.
 
As part of the agreement, the Foundation will continue to support the School financially over the next four years, investing over $1.4 in its operating costs and future growth. In addition, it will donate the extensive use of historic, residential, and classroom facilities at Taliesin and Taliesin West, which cost the Foundation over $1 million in cash a year for the spaces utilized by the School.  Combined with the more than $2 million raised, this Foundation investment of $7 million will support the School through at least 2019.
 
“We are heartened to see the depth and breadth of support for the School among its various communities and constituencies,” said Alanna Mack, the Foundation Board’s Chair. “We look forward to working together with School leaders as we all continue on this path towards the School’s independent incorporation.”
 
“We are so thankful to the more than 317 individuals, foundations, and corporations who gave to our Campaign,” said the School’s Dean, Aaron Betsky. “We have been hard at work with the Foundation’s staff and Board to ensure the School’s future not just in financial and organizational terms, but also by improving its curriculum and by developing programs that continue Wright’s legacy in organic architecture and learning by doing in ways that answer to our needs for a more sustainable, open, and beautiful human-made environment.”
 
Betsky, who has been Dean since February of this year, pointed out a four-year commitment to the mining communities of Globe and Miami, Arizona, where the School will engage in community–based projects, and similar efforts in Wisconsin (the School “migrates” between Taliesin in Spring Green, Wisconsin and Taliesin West in Scottsdale, Arizona twice a year), as well as an expansion of the School’s program by which students design, build, and inhabit “desert shelters” at Taliesin West. He also noted new courses in design, theory, and digital fabrication, and a Spring lecture program that will bring such luminaries as Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Liz Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Thom Mayne, Julie Eizenberg, Todd Williams and Billy Tsien, Winy Maas, and Urban Think Tank (Hubert Klumpner and Alfredo Brillembourg) to the campus’ intimate theater for discussions with students, faculty, and invited guests.
 
The Foundation will now work with the School Board and staff to develop a “Change of Control” application to the HLC, including drafts of multiple legal and incorporation documents. The HLC Board is expected to review this application in June of 2016. If the HLC approves the application, the Foundation will file documents with federal and state agencies to establish the School as an autonomous, independently incorporated subsidiary of the Foundation. The expectation is for the full process to be completed by early 2017.

Image via taliesin.edu


 

 

 
 
 

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