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dancing with architecture: R.M. Schindler's El Pueblo Ribera Court in La Jolla, California

by LiveModern Webmaster last modified Aug 09, 2015 01:02 AM
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by bubba of the bubbles (noreply@blogger.com) last modified Aug 08, 2015



 

 



The bride and I spent a four-day weekend in San Diego last weekend, so I needed to make a pilgrimage down to La Jolla to R.M. Schindler's El Pueblo Ribera Court. Designed and built between 1923 and 1925, these apartments (now condos) are one of Schindler's key projects.

Constructed out of board-formed concrete, redwood, and glass, Schindler, with Clyde Chase as the contractor, built a dozen units, each with their own courtyards and, at the time, ocean views from the open patios above the living space below.






Many of the units have been modified, some heavily, with folks generally finishing out the second story patios into living space. One owner has restored his unit back to its original glory, including the open second-floor patio (and it looks AMAZING [and the dedication to Schindler is admirable in that they converted indoor space back to the original outdoor space]). Ten of the twelve units still exist with the missing two replaced by new construction inspired by Schindler's design (Pueblo Ribera on steroids...).

Studying the maps I realize that I should have gone over to Playa Sure Avenue to see the street-facing units over there, including one with the outdoor ground-floor patio very close to the street. Next trip!

Areas outlined in red are the remnants of the original units (look like C's) and garages (rectangles).


The unit that has been restored to original condition, including replacing the redwood. When looking at the site plan (and assuming up is north [it's not...]), this is the southeasternmost unit.

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Historic landmark designation.

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Looking northward up the pathway between the units from Gravilla Avenue.

Detail of the original concrete. The literature says Schindler and Chase used sand from the nearby beach, but didn't add enough binder to the mix to result in good concrete.

Stylized view of one unit's finished out second floor.

Another fixed up unit, but with a finished-out second floor. This is the southwesternmost unit.

Detail of one of the windows. Appears the concrete has been covered in stucco.

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View form the service alley looking northish at the southern unit. Original concrete. First floor is partially buried (the material covers a window). Can see the chimney, which had access inside the unit and on the second floor.

The beach at the end of Gravilla! Wish one of these units was a VRBO...


 

 

 
 
 

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