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by Marshall Mayer last modified Aug 17, 2012 09:05 AM
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Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 12 votes)
LiveModern subscribes to blogs about modern and sustainable design for housing products and services. We've aggregated the subscriptions into the Blogs section. If you publish or know of a blog that other LiveModern readers would like, please contact us and we'll subscribe to it here.



 

 


Virtual workplace do and do nots

by Alex from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:15 AM
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BusinessWeek has a nice little rundown of dos and don'ts for managers managing homeworkers. Here's a do: "Help them stop. The trouble with most virtual workers isn't that they slack off, but that they don't know when to call it a day. That's one reason they're 16% more productive than tethered counterparts. But that extra work can lead to burnout. Encourage employees to have personal lives." And here's a don't: "Neglect training. Most companies don't teach executives how to manage virtual workers, and managers often don't communicate enough with direct reports. That can leave home-based employees feeling isolated, says Colleen Garton, author of Managing Without Walls. Garton says managers should check in each day with virtual workers."

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Chandelier Installed

by Christina from dave and christina  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:32 AM
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As I mentioned previously, Dave found this chandelier at Cosmic Closet in Memphis and they ordered it for us. He worked wonders in rewiring it to make it drop the necessary 13 feet then Dave and Bob the electrician put all the glass pieces together and installed it last week. It looks wonderful!! I am [...]

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Hearth gets installed!

by Christina from dave and christina  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:37 AM
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Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)

Martin smoothing the concrete of the hearth. Hearth and surrounds of poured concrete installed! Yea!!!! This turned out really smooth and beautiful!! The oven to the right is in a holding position waiting to be installed. Not in this room! Ash cleanout. More garage photos. Detail at garage door. After living in the garage and on the terrace, it is [...]

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Mini 1/2 Bath Dimensions

by Jamie from Farmhouse Modern  (modern blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:27 AM
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Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)

I am working on a remodel and trying to shoe-horn in a 1/2 bathroom. For the umpteenth time, I am trying to figure out the minimum and desired dimensions. To save myself time in the future, and in the spirit of sharing, I thought that I would share the results of my efforts. There [...]

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200805040853

Destination Japan

by creede from Grassroots Modern  (design blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:45 AM
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If you haven’t already checked out the new Destination Japan series over at the MoMA Store, it’s time you get over there. While Japanese design isn’t exclusively modern, there is often a simplicity that lends itself to modern decor. Many of the items included in Destination Japan are exclusive to MoMA, and pricing [...]

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Willie just called

by Don from Hus Langford  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:32 AM
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...and he says he can do the foundation work, probably early July. He's going to call Janne to go over details. I'm still planning to go over to help if possible. This gives me a couple more months to work on my cardboard model!! [...]

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Anna Maria Indrio, Architect - Part 4

by shadmin from Slow Home  (green blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:05 AM
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In this installment of her SlowHomeTV interview, Danish architect Anna Maria Indrio talks about the C.F. Møller Architects multi family projects Nordlyset and Østerbrogade [...]

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Pigeonniers

by Alex from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:20 AM
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One attraction of buying an old property in rural France is that you usually get space to spare, writes Shedworking's French correspondent Nick Inman . You don’t need to think of buying or building a shed in the garden when you have convertible outbuildings in your grounds to spare. You may get a barn or two included in the purchase price, or a chicken coop or pig sty; but if you’re lucky your house will come with a pigeonnier, a quaint free-standing dovecote ripe for office development. There are pigeonniers all over France but they are concentrated in the southwest. In the north (and in Britain) where a cold climate meant winter food was often in short supply, keeping pigeons was a feudal privilege and a dovecot an ostentatious sign of privilege. In the poorer, warmer south where the human population was thinly spread any smallholder could drill a few large holes in a wall to let the birds in to roost. In times before cars and supermarkets, life in the country meant self-sufficiency or starvation. Pigeons were easy to keep: they bred quickly, producing an endless supply of eggs and meat for the table and droppings which could be used as fertilizer for the fields and vineyards. From the 16th century on, landowners with surplus cash delighted in commissioning round or square towers with elegantly pointed roofs a short way from the house, perhaps stranded in a field of sunflowers. These were still functional structures but they had now become follies.Now that farming is mechanised, fertilizer comes in sacks marked up with health warnings and life in the countryside more bourgeois-bucolic than a slog, property owners are putting their pigeonniers to new uses. Even though they were built for birds, most pigeonniers are large enough to make a decent-sized room out of. They usually stand on stilts capped with mushroom shaped stones to protect the pigeons from rodent predators and a flight or steps or a ladder is needed to get inside but that only adds to the sense or intimacy. What they don’t have are windows and you have to be ingenious to get around this limitation if you want to keep the harmony of the architecture. But with the aid of a grant for the preservation of a local rural building, there’s not much else to stop you turning the cute little stone or half-timbered tower in your grounds into a home office. Just remember to block up the access holes in the roof or you’ll be forever cleaning pigeon muck off your keyboard. A version of this article appears in the latest issue of The Shed magazine.

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Daybed shedworking (and shedcycling)

by Alex from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:16 AM
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Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)

Regular readers will be aware of Shedworking's pet delights (rotating garden offices, interesting bookshelves, strange workdesks/chairs) and here's a welcome addition, the Daybed from Humanscale Design , made of 10% recycled materials and 95% recyclable materials, with non-fabric components constructed of aluminum, steel, and polycarbonate. Their goal was to come up with "a comfortable, ergonomic home workstation solution in a contemporary visual design to complement home décor". Apparently it's: "designed with total comfort in mind and may be easily adjusted to suit users of virtually any stature for light home office use. The reclining backrest keeps the upper body and spine healthy and relaxed while the attached ottoman slides upward or downward to accommodate users of different heights. Daybed’s high back curves around the user’s head to provide neck support and privacy, while built-in speakers positioned at ear height may be connected to a laptop computer or other peripheral device. While reclined, the backrest also supports the elbows, reducing stress in the arms and shoulders." Humanscale have also come up with the Ciclu which combines a personal computer with a stationary bike so you can burn off calories while reading Shedworking. I know which one I like best. Via Born Rich who also have a rundown of the 10 swankiest workstations (some of them already profiled on this site)

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Manhut

by Alex from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:22 AM
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Average Rating: 1 2 3 4 5 ( 0 votes)

Ottawa architect Kevin Deevey describes this backyard studio - known as the 'Manhut' by the family of the owner - as "more of an experiment than anything". He continues: "The program involved simply getting a small, quiet workspace into an otherwise cramped and full New Edinburg semi. The solution was to build a decorated shed in an otherwise shady and secluded part of the rear yard. Measuring 10' x 10', the "hut" accomodates a table, chair and a precious grey market motorcycle." You can download more details about the build here . A Bill Kratz spot.

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this website is for sale

This website will undergo significant changes in 2019.  First, the domain name has been sold. Visitors will not be able to find the site at livemodern.com after about six months. In the meantime, we are looking for a buyer for the content, someone who wants to continue the mission of the website. If that is you, contact marshall [at] livemodern.com. I will provide details.

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