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by Marshall Mayer last modified Aug 17, 2012 09:05 AM
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LiveModern subscribes to blogs about modern and sustainable design for housing products and services. We've aggregated the subscriptions into the Blogs section. If you publish or know of a blog that other LiveModern readers would like, please contact us and we'll subscribe to it here.



 

 


The days of urban sprawl are over...

by shadmin from Slow Home  (green blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:15 AM
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...but not for the reasons you think   By Richard Florida from the Globe and Mail . One of the few things increasing as fast as the price of oil lately has been the amount of commentary linking higher energy costs to the death of suburbia. Clearly, higher gas prices have affected where people want – or can afford – to live. Just as the demand for SUVs plummets and consumers have finally begun to see the point of hybrids, people are turning away from sprawling exurbs toward urban neighbourhoods and inner suburbs....

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Ladder

by jhammond (noreply@blogger.com) from Exclusively Blog - Modern Furniture and Design Blog  (design blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:55 AM
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I don't know if this is brilliant or ridiculous, but I love it either way. The Cima Ladder was designed as a way to showcase the capabilities and amazing properties of composites materials. The ladder is produced in a single piece, using a [...]

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Near the Office, a Million Miles Away

by tres_arboles (noreply@blogger.com) from Three Tree Journal  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:34 AM
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With a hat tip to Gazelle, owner of the Leaping Beauty blog. His posts are blissfully brief but an accompanying photo almost always inspires a mindwalk. I took my digi with me on a walk I frequently make at lunch. I saw this cedar and damn if it didn't [...]

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Want to always stay updated on the oil crisis?

by Jan & Myleen (noreply@blogger.com) from Sjodin Dream Home  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:34 AM
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I suggest you visit this website for tons of shocking information about our oil dependencies, our global impact and what's being done in the [...]

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Green garden offices

by noreply@blogger.com (Alex) from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:23 AM
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The last time we talked about 'greenwashing' on Shedworking , there was a very healthy debate about the enivronmental values of garden office suppliers. Now Lynn Fotheringham from InsideOut Buildings (whose models are pictured above and below) has put together a personal guide to choosing an eco-friendly shed with a seven-point plan for choosing sustainable materials. It's quite long, but well worth a read: 1. PVC windows Problem: People think that double-glazing is eco-friendly because it saves energy, which is true. But look further and you discover that the amount of energy used to manufacture UPVC is enormous. Also PVC frames are bigger and wider than wood and so reduce the amount of light coming through a window. Solution: Buy locally from a joinery manufacturer and check the wood comes from renewable forests, ideally in Britain or Western Europe. 2. Wooden cladding and flooring Problem: This is often used on garden buildings and around the house. The assumption that wood = eco-friendly is simplistic. Many cladding and flooring products are pressure treated and imported, both of which use unnecessary energy. So while wood is better than manmade claddings and floorings, it can still be energy-expensive. Solution: Choose untreated British or European wood from well managed local forests. Our beautiful larch cladding, for instance, is grown in Scotland, then cut and planed by our local timber merchant, with no treatments or preservatives. 3. Insulation Problem: Insulating your home or garden room properly will help the environment, again by saving energy. To do the job properly, you have to use a lot of insulation material. In garden offices, for instance, all surfaces should be insulated to an absolute minimum of 100mm. We use UK manufactured insulation materials, either sheepswool or Rockwool, from firms who have an excellent environmental policy in their factory. Which means we can insulate our buildings’ walls to a generous 200mm for maximum insulation efficiency while remaining environmentally responsible. Solution: Look at the manufacturing process before choosing an insulation material. Can it be recycled? Has it been imported? Does the manufacturer run their factory processes sustainably? 4. Green and living roofs These are undoubtedly eco-friendly and can be highly effective on larger buildings. But there are drawbacks. You need at least 600mm of soil to achieve a practical level of insulation. The insulating properties are reduced when the soil is dry. In summer you have to irrigate and weed your roof. You have to use several different layers of plastic for waterproofing and containing the soil. On the other hand when insulation isn’t so important, say for a garage or shed, a green roof is a great way to conceal an eyesore, add interest to your garden and provide an important space for wildlife. 5. Wind turbines Wind turbines simply don’t hit the mark unless you live in a rural area with very strong winds. Current technology means that a small urban turbine will probably generate less energy than it takes to make. Instead, use low energy light bulbs, don’t leave equipment on standby and insulate your home properly. 6. Recyclable materials Even the word ’recyclable’ can be misleading. Thousands of products claim to be recyclable but, in all honesty, so what? Are you really going to re-use a load of exhausted plastic insulation in 15 years’ time, or is anyone else? We recommend a common sense approach. Our buildings are designed to last for a very long time, not to fall apart after just a few years. We think this is the best approach. If you build for life rather than for the short term, the need to recycle becomes less relevant. 7. Paints and wood stains These are the ingredients to avoid in paints and stains: Solvents and white spirit, turpentine, terpenes, ethereal oils, and acrylics. Ingredients to look for:- Water, binders , non-toxic pigments, mineral fillers and waxes. So have InsideOut Buildings found a truly green solution to all their garden building challenges? “No, it is an ongoing process as more affordable, sensible, sustainable products become available” says Lynn. “For example we use untreated cedar shingle roofing which is imported. We’ve been looking for a UK wood shingling manufacturer for some time. Is there anybody out there?”

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The Venom Sucker

by Don (noreply@blogger.com) from Hus Langford  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:34 AM
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Sooz is in the States right now, visiting family and friends, gallivanting about, having a grand old time.Actually, she is contributing a great deal to the house-building enterprise, in fact she just emailed me this photo of her latest purchase- a venom [...]

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Some Pig

by Tiny Circus (noreply@blogger.com) from The Tiny Circus Chronicle  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:23 AM
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We are making an outdoor shower today, old tarps stored in the top of the barn are our raw materials.Greta is drilling holes in cedar for a wooden base to stand on.Jason and Carlos cut the tarp to conform to the curved walls. First they cut a template to [...]

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Camelia Cottage

by noreply@blogger.com (Alex) from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:22 AM
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While the Camelia Cottage project in Melbourne from Swank-e as outlined on the marvellous pushpullbar2 forum is arguably not a 'real' garden office, it is a fascinating architectural build in the garden: Swank-e describes it as "a dramatic insertion at the back of the property". It was in fact a former outhouse. Via Judit Bellostes

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Arioso Toro - light shedworking

by noreply@blogger.com (Alex) from Shedworking  (other blog) — Jan 04, 2012 04:15 AM
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A nice summery shedworking atmosphere, Arioso Toro comes from Thailand-based Gaspard and is inspired by Japanese paper lanterns. The fabric shutter is made from polyester. Via Trendhunter

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concrete . . . and lots of it!

by 7301 Ava Ln (noreply@blogger.com) from 7301 Ava Ln  (build blog) — Jan 04, 2012 02:38 AM
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The Concrete guys poured the patio, planting beds, and firepit area last week. here are [...]

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